History of Civilization in England, Volume 1 (Google eBook)

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Longman, Green, Longman, Roberts & Green, 1864 - France
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Contents

Their operation on the distribution of wealth 4759
47
Illustrations from the history of French art 648050
50
Illustrations of these principles from Ireland 59 01
59
From Egypt 7584
75
From Central America 8485
84
And from Mexico and Peru 80
98
Influence of the general aspects of nature upon the imagination
107
And by danger generally 113115
113
This proposition illustrated by a comparison between Hindustan
120
Further illustration from Central America 133134
133
Hence it appears that of the two classes of mental and physical
142
MENTALlAWS ARE EITHER MORAL OR INTELLECTUAL COMPARISON OF MORAL
153
Comparison of the moral with the intellectual element
159
Rut moral truths have not changed 103
167
EIa?trations of this from Rome and Spain 168171
168
Illustrations from Russia and Turkey 177179
177
The invention of gunpowder 185190
185
The discoveries made by political economists 191200
191
i The application of steam to purposes of travelling 200203
200
CHAPTER V
207
Comparison of the history of England with that of Prance 215216
215
Necessity of ascertaining the fundamental laws of intellectual pro
222
Influence of religion on the progress of society 232244
232
And from Sweden and Scotland 242244
242
Influence of government on the progress of society 250264
250
Legislators have caused smuggling with all its attendant crimes 256257
256
England has been less interfered with in these ways than other
263
Conclusions arrived at by the preceding investigations
265
An inquiry into the changes in historical researches will throw
271
history 27022
280
Illustration of this from the history of Charlemagne by Turpin 292294
292
The first improvement in writing history began in the fourteenth
298
Also in the work of Dr Horston the Golden Tooth 304305
304
Origin of religious toleration in England
310
This tendency displayed in Chillingworth 819321
321
Great advantage of this 327329
327
Influence of this spirit upon Sir Thomas Browne 834337
337
Blustration of this by the superstition of sailors and agriculturists
348
Aided by the vices of the king 855
361
The clergy than united with the dissenters and brought about
367
Hence a schism in the church 875377
377
But was weakened by the dissenters headed by Wesley and White
383
Rapid succession of sceptical controversies 380391
392
This tendency was aided by George I and George II 401403
401
Continuation of the movement by Charron 475478
475
The most remarkable steps in favour of toleration were however
483
He supported the new secidar scheme of government against
489
His liberal treatment of the Protestants 406600
500
Evidence of the illiberality of the French Protestants 508525
508
Richelieu put down the rebellion but still abstained from perse
520
This liberal policy on the part of the government was only part
528
Analogy between Descartes and Richelieu 543544
543
It was also seen in the wars of the Fronde 549552
549
Coinciding with this the feudal system and an hereditary aristo
562
Effects of this difference between the two countries in the four
568
This state contrasted with that of England 575576
575
Illustration from the history of chivalry 607583
583
CHAPTER IX
586
THE ENERGY OF THE PROTECTIVE SPIRIT IN FRANCE EXPLAINS THE FAILURE
595
Vanity and imbecility of the French nobles 608015
611
CHAPTER XI
621
About the eleventh centurv the spirit of inquirv began to weaken
649
Gloomy political prospects of England late in the eighteenth cen
651
And from every branch of literature 6516 52
652
Admiration of England expressed by Frenchmen 668609
668
Violence of the government 682685
682
Hence they wero led to assail Christianity 693697
693
But owing to the progress of knowledge a counter reaction
696
CHAPTER XIII
701
Still further progress early in the seventeenth century 708710
708
Illustration of this from the work of Audigier 718721
718
Immense improvements introduced by Voltaire 730760
730
ffi views adopted by Mallet Mably Vellv ViUaret Duclos
737
And on the pedantic admirers of antiquity 743745
743
Itmorant prejudice against him in England
750
The discourses of Turgot and their influence 757758
757
THE EIGHTEENTH CENTURY
763
Just at the same time the government began to attack the church 708770
770
Jansenism being allied to Calvinism its revival in France aided
779
Effects of this on the sciences of heat light and electricity 706798
798
Also on chemistry aud geology 709807
807
Relation between inventions discoveries and method and
810
cmnexion between these views find subsequent discoveries 816819
816
Bichats work on life 823827
823
Physical science is essentially democratic 837840
837
And in the establishment of clubs 843845
843
General reflections 850854
850

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Popular passages

Page 23 - antecedents; and that, therefore, if we were acquainted with the whole of the antecedents, and with all the laws of their movements, we could with unerring certainty predict the whole of their immediate results. This, unless I am greatly mistaken, is the view which must be held by every man whose mind is unbiased by
Page 146 - nations, that which first excites attention, through its intimate connexion with the phenomena of Production, is the perpetual, and, so far as human foresight can extend, the unlimited, growth of man's power over nature. Our knowledge of the properties and laws of physical objects shows no
Page 432 - But my consideration is narrow, confined, and wholly limited to the policy of the question.' At p. 183: we should act in regard to America, not
Page 316 - every department of practical and speculative knowledge; has weakened the authority of the privileged classes, and thus placed liberty on a surer foundation; has chastized the despotism of princes; has restrained the arrogance of the nobles; and has even diminished the prejudices of the clergy. In a word, it is this which
Page 205 - man, than has been effected by the united abilities of all the statesmen and legislators of whom history has preserved an authentic account. The result of these great discoveries I am not here
Page 202 - at its ultimate results, is probably the most important book that has ever been written, and is certainly the most valuable contribution ever made by a single man towards establishing the principles on which government should be based. In this great work, the
Page 262 - there is none of greater moment than trade, the spread of which has probably done more than any other single agent to increase the comfort and happiness of man. But every European government which has legislated much respecting trade, has acted as if its main object were to suppress the trade, and ruin
Page 364 - dialectician of his time; a writer, too, of singular clearness, and, among British metaphysicians, inferior only to Berkeley. This profound thinker published several speculations very unfavourable to the church, and directly opposed to principles which are essential to ecclesiastical authority. As a natural consequence, he was hated by the clergy; his doctrines were declared to be
Page 42 - call the General Aspect of Nature, produces its principal results by exciting the imagination, and by suggesting those innumerable superstitions which are the great obstacles to advancing knowledge. And as, in the infancy of a people, the power of such superstitions
Page 10 - then he is qualified to be an historian; he is able to write the history of a great people, and his work becomes an authority on the subject which it professes to treat. Since the early part of the eighteenth century, a few great thinkers have indeed arisen, who

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