Rational theology and Christian philosophy in England in the seventeenth century, Volume 1 (Google eBook)

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W. Blackwood, 1872 - Religious thought - 463 pages
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Page 85 - It is not growing like a tree In bulk, doth make man better be; Or standing long an oak, three hundred year, To fall a log, at last, dry, bald, and sere: A lily of a day, Is fairer far, in May, Although it fall, and die that night; It was the plant, and flower of light. In small proportions, we just beauties see: And in short measures, life may perfect be.
Page 360 - ... violence that it broke a cable, and I lost my anchor ; and here again I was exposed to the mercy of the sea, and the gentleness of an element that could neither distinguish things nor persons. And but that He who stilleth the raging of the sea and the noise of His waves, and the madness of His people , had provided a plank for me, I had been lost to all the opportunities of content or study. But I know not whether I have been more preserved by the courtesies of my friends, or the gentleness and...
Page 111 - ... that was due to him for so preserving it, and for vindicating it at such a price; that it had power to reconcile him to those whom he had most offended and provoked; and continued to his age with that rare felicity, that his company was acceptable where his spirit was odious; and he was, at least, pitied where he was most detested.
Page 149 - Brentford, and the furious resolution of the two houses not to admit any treaty for peace, those indispositions which had before touched him grew into a perfect habit of uncheerfulness, and he who had been so exactly easy and affable to all men that his face and countenance was always present, and vacant to his company, and held any cloudiness and less pleasantness of the visage a kind of rudeness or incivility, became on a sudden less communicable, and thence, very sad, pale, and exceedingly affected...
Page 360 - I cast anchor ; and, thinking to ride safely, the storm followed me with so impetuous violence that it broke a cable, and I lost my anchor ; and, here again, I was exposed to the mercy of the sea, and the gentleness of an element that could neither distinguish things nor persons : and but that He...
Page 109 - There was never so great a mind and spirit contained in so little room ; so large an understanding, and so unrestrained a fancy, in so very small a body...
Page 410 - The old man told him that he worshipped the fire only, and acknowledged no other God. At which answer Abraham grew so zealously angry that he thrust the old man out of his tent, and exposed him to all the evils of the night and an unguarded condition. When the old man was gone, God called to Abraham and asked him where the stranger was ; he replied, ' I thrust him away because he did not worship Thee.
Page 340 - In a word, take away tyranny, which is the devil's instrument to support errors, and superstitions, and impieties, in the several parts of the world, which could not otherwise long withstand the power of truth ; I say, take away tyranny, and restore Christians to their just and full liberty of captivating their understanding to Scripture only, and as rivers, when they have a free passage, run all to the ocean, so it may well be hoped, by God's blessing, that universal liberty, thus moderated, may...
Page 338 - Propose me anything out of this Book, and require whether I believe it or no, and seem it never so incomprehensible to human reason, I will subscribe it with hand and heart, as knowing no demonstration can be stronger than this: God hath said so; therefore it is true.
Page 97 - Porter, and divers others. The first that broke silence was good old Ben, Prepar'd before with Canary wine, And he told them plainly he deserv'd the bays, For his were call'd works, where others were but plays. Torn Carew was next, but he had a fault That would not well stand with a laureate : His muse was hard bound, and th' issue of s brain Was seldom brought forth but with trouble and pain.

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