Debating the Civil Rights Movement, 1945-1968

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Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, Jan 1, 2006 - History - 227 pages
3 Reviews
No other book about the civil rights movement captures the drama and impact of the black struggle for equality better than Debating the Civil Rights Movement, 1945 1968. Two of the most respected scholars of African-American history, Steven F. Lawson and Charles M. Payne, examine the individuals who made the movement a success, both at the highest level of government and in the grassroots trenches. Designed specifically for college and university courses in American history, this is the best introduction available to the glory and agony of these turbulent times. Carefully chosen primary documents augment each essay giving students the opportunity to interpret the historical record themselves and engage in meaningful discussion. In this revised and updated edition, Lawson and Payne have included additional analysis on the legacy of Martin Luther King and added important new documents."

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Review: Debating the Civil Rights Movement, 1945 1968

User Review  - SUSAN OWEN GLASER - Goodreads

GOOD NARRATIVE OF THOSE WHO WALKED THE NONVIOLENT WALK. THERE SHOILD BE A BOOK SHELF FOR AFRICAN AMERICAN WRITERS!!! Read full review

Review: Debating the Civil Rights Movement, 1945 1968

User Review  - em ma - Goodreads

payne = <3 spent hours outside a coffee shop taking notes about queer theory in relation to the civil rights movement, it was an amazing afternoon Read full review

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About the author (2006)

Steven F. Lawson is professor of history at Rutgers University and author of Running for Freedom: Civil Rights and Black Politics in America since 1941.Charles M. Payne is Sally Dalton Robinson professor of history, African American studies and sociology and director of the African and African-American Studies Program at Duke University. He is the author of I've Got the Light of Freedom: The Organizing Tradition and the Mississippi Freedom Struggle.

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