Events of 1812-13 (Google eBook)

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Lea and Blanchard, 1845 - United States
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Page 435 - Whilst we follow them among the tumbling mountains of ice, and behold them penetrating into the deepest frozen recesses of Hudson's Bay and Davis's Straits, whilst we are looking for them beneath the arctic circle, we hear that they have pierced into the opposite region of polar cold, that they are at the antipodes, and engaged under the frozen serpent of the south.
Page 491 - Born, Sir, in a land of liberty ; having early learned its value ; having engaged in a perilous conflict to defend it ; having, in a word, devoted the best years of my life to secure its permanent establishment in my own country, my anxious recollections, my sympathetic feelings, and my best wishes, are irresistibly excited, whensoever, in any country, I see an oppressed nation unfurl the banners of freedom.
Page 376 - And ne'er shall the sons of Columbia be slaves, While the earth bears a plant, or the sea rolls its waves.
Page 50 - Congress shall make no law respecting the establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof...
Page 435 - Straits, whilst we are looking for them beneath the Arctic Circle, we hear that they have pierced into the opposite region of Polar cold, that they are at the antipodes, and engaged under the frozen serpent of the South. Falkland Island, which seemed too remote and romantic an object for the grasp of national ambition, is but a stage and resting-place in the progress of their victorious industry.
Page 529 - A new edition, with numerous illustrations ; together with a General History of the Horse ; a Dissertation on the American Trotting Horse; how trained and jockeyed; an Account of his Remarkable Performances; and an Essay on the Ass and the Mule.
Page i - HISTORICAL SKETCH OF THE SECOND WAR BETWEEN THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA AND GREAT BRITAIN, DECLARED BY ACT OF CONGRESS, JUNE 18, 1812, AND CONCLUDED BY PEACE, FEBRUARY 15, 1815. BY CHARLES J. INGERSOLL.
Page 278 - Father! Attend to what I am now going to say. It is a matter of much weight. The great King's enemies are many, and they grow fast in number. They were formerly like young panthers. They could neither bite nor scratch. We could play with them safely. We feared nothing they could do to us.
Page 492 - I rejoice that liberty, which you have so long embraced with enthusiasm liberty, of which you have been the invincible defenders, now finds an asylum in the bosom of a regularly organized government...
Page 492 - Revolution have produced the deepest solicitude as well as the highest admiration. To call your nation brave were to pronounce but common praise. Wonderful people! Ages to come will read with astonishment the history of your brilliant exploits. I rejoice that the period of your toils and of your immense sacrifices is approaching.