Growing Public: Volume 1, The Story: Social Spending and Economic Growth Since the Eighteenth Century

Front Cover
Cambridge University Press, Jan 12, 2004 - Business & Economics - 396 pages
0 Reviews
Peter Lindert inquires as to whether social policies that redistribute income impose constraints on economic growth. Although taxes and transfers have been debated for centuries, only recently have we been able to obtain a clear view of the evolution of social spending. Lindert argues that, contrary to the intuition of many economists and the ideology of many politicians, social spending has contributed to, rather than inhibited, economic growth. Peter Lindert is a prize-winning researcher and teacher at the University of California-Davis where he serves as President of the Economic History Association and as Co-Editor of its journal. His textbooks in international economics have been translated into at least eight other languages, and he has previously taught at the University of Essex, Harvard University, Moscow State University, and University of Wisconsin.
  

What people are saying - Write a review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - thcson - LibraryThing

The author argues that social spending has contributed to economic growth, not inhibited it, and goes through the historical evidence for this thesis in some detail. It's a bit of a terse book ... Read full review

Contents

Patterns and Puzzles
3
The Road from Home
4
Taxing Spending and Giving in the Late Eighteenth Century
7
The Elderly
9
The Long Rise of Social Spending
11
The Robin Hood Paradox
15
Is the Welfare State a Free Lunch?
16
An Educational Puzzle
19
Analyses of Local Experience with School Choice
161
Deviant California
162
Choice in Higher Education
164
Subsidized School Choice in Other Countries
165
Rewarding Individual Teacher Performance
168
Explaining the Rise of Social Transfers Since 1880
171
Shared Fears from World Wars and the Great Depression
176
The Role of Political Voice
179

Findings
20
How Social Spending Emerged before World War II
22
Lessons from the Postwar Boom
26
Since 1980 Aging Has Brought New Budget Pressures
27
Unlocking the FreeLunch Puzzle
29
How Welfare States Control the Disincentives
30
A True but Limited Cost
32
Reconciling Europes Unemployment with Its Satisfactory Growth
33
Two CostCutting Principles in Democratic Welfare States
34
I
37
Poor Relief before 1880
39
How Much Did Europe Give the Poor before 1880?
40
The Amounts of Public Poor Relief to 1880
45
How Europe Gave Relief and for What
48
The Battle over Putting the Poor to Work
49
Indoor versus Outdoor Relief
51
Administrative Costs
54
Cash versus Aid in Kind
55
Who Received It
56
American Private and Public Relief before the New Deal
58
How Much Public Relief Was Given
59
Private Charity in the United States and the Crowding Out Issue
60
Two Attacks on Outdoor Relief in New York
65
Interpreting the Puzzles of Early Poor Relief
67
The Reform Acts Voice and the Poor
71
The RuralUrban Puzzle
73
Englands Rural Southeastern Bias and the Boyer Model
75
An Extension to Scandinavia
77
The International Stagnation of Relief 18201880
80
The General Pre1930 Pattern of Votes and Social Spending
82
What Happened to the Race to the Bottom?
84
Political Voice and Poor Relief
85
The Rise of Mass Public Schooling before 1914
87
Patterns in the Inputs into Mass Schooling
88
Competing Theories
99
Updating the ElitePressure Theories
100
Capitalist Social Control
101
Domineering Government
102
Vested Interests within the Educational Sector
103
The Role of Decentralization
104
Popular Votes Public Schools
105
But What Caused Democracy?
107
Reinterpreting National Histories of Mass Schooling
110
The English Delay
113
Rethinking German Education
115
Decentralized North America
122
Elites Votes and Schools
126
Public Schooling in the Twentieth Century What Happened to US Leadership?
128
Who Are the Leaders?
129
In Learning
132
When Did This Pattern Emerge?
138
In Inputs into Education
142
Teaching Inputs per Student
143
Teachers Pay and Quality
145
Summing Up the United States Symptoms
150
The Underlying Incentive Issues
153
Quantity Incentives versus Quality Incentives
154
Student Accountability
155
Competition among Schools
157
The Long Sweep of US School Choice
158
Votes for Women
182
The Rate of Turnover of the Chief Executive
183
Globalization and Safety Nets
186
Summary
188
II
191
The Public Pension Crisis
193
In an Older World Something Has to Give
194
Pressures in the OECD Countries
196
Who Is Least Prepared?
198
How Will Budgets Be Adjusted?
200
Immigrants and Pensioners
205
Returning to a FullyFunded System Is Unlikely
207
Summary
208
Social Transfers in the Second and Third Worlds
210
The Aging Trend Is Nearly Global
211
Special Pressures in Transition Economies
212
Third World Social Transfers
218
East Asia Is Not So Different
219
A Different Kind of Pension Crisis
221
Global Divergence Convergence and the Robin Hood Paradox
222
III
225
Keys to the FreeLunch Puzzle
227
The Familiar Cautionary Tales Miss the Mark
228
Harold and Phyllis
229
MicroStudies of Labor Supply
230
Simulations
231
Global Growth Econometrics
233
What Better Tests Show
234
ProGrowth and Not So Progressive
235
Recipients Work Incentives
245
Good Riddance to Old Lemons?
249
Does the Dole Also Harvest Lemons?
252
Some Growth Benefits of High Social Transfers
253
Child Care Support and Career Investment in Mothers
254
Public Health Care
257
Why These Keys?
263
On the WellKnown Demise of the Swedish Welfare State
264
Swedens Growth and Social Spending Since 1950
267
What Went Wrong after the 1970s?
271
Macroeconomic Policy
272
The Demise of Swedish Corporatism
275
What Role for Swedens High Tax Rates?
277
ProGrowth Social Spending
281
Investing in Womens Work and in Child Care
282
Education and Retraining
288
Late Retirement
289
Why No Demise
291
How the Keys Were Made Democracy and Cost Control
296
Democracy Budget Size and Budget Blunders
297
Illustrative TaxTransfer Blunders
299
Dutch Disability Policy
300
The Thatcher Poll Tax of 19891992
301
On the Tax Side
302
The Expenditure Side
305
Hence No Retreat
306
Notes
309
Bibliography
339
Acknowledgments
363
Index
365
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

References to this book

All Book Search results »

About the author (2004)

Peter H. Lindert is Professor of Economics at the University of California, Davis.

Bibliographic information