The life of Samuel Johnson, LL. D.: comprehending an account of his studies, and numerous works, in chronological order; a series of his epistolary correspondence and conversations with many eminent persons; and various original pieces of his composition, never before published; the whole exhibiting a view of literature and literary men in Great Britain, for near half a century during which he flourished, Volume 5 (Google eBook)

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Printed for J. Richardson, 1821
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Page 288 - Canst thou not minister to a mind diseas'd, Pluck from the memory a rooted sorrow, Raze out the written troubles of the brain, And with some sweet oblivious antidote Cleanse the stuff 'd bosom of that perilous stuff, Which weighs upon the heart ? Doct.
Page 24 - The busy day, the peaceful night, Unfelt, uncounted, glided by; His frame was firm — his powers were bright, Though now his eightieth year was nigh. Then with no fiery throbbing pain, No cold gradations of decay, Death broke at once the vital chain, And freed his soul the nearest way.
Page 23 - Condemn'd to Hope's delusive mine, As on we toil from day to day, By sudden blasts, or slow decline, Our social comforts drop away. Well tried through many a varying year, See Levett to the grave descend ; Officious, innocent, sincere, Of every friendless name the friend. Yet still he fills Affection's eye, Obscurely wise and coarsely kind ; Nor...
Page 165 - Forbearing one another, and forgiving one another, if any man have a quarrel against any: even as Christ forgave you, so also do ye. And above all these things put on charity, which is the bond of perfectness.
Page 258 - Pride was the source of that refusal, and the remembrance of it was painful. A few years ago, I desired to atone for this fault; I went to Uttoxeter in very bad weather, and stood for a considerable time bareheaded in the rain, on the spot where my father's stall used to stand. In contrition I stood, and I hope the penance was expiatory...
Page 24 - His virtues walk'd their narrow round, Nor made a pause, nor left a void ; And sure the' Eternal Master found The single talent well employ'd.
Page 198 - Johnson having argued for some time with a pertinacious gentleman ; his opponent, who had talked in a very puzzling manner, happened to say, " I don't understand you, Sir ; " upon which Johnson observed, " Sir, I have found you an argument ; but I am not obliged to find you an understanding.
Page 102 - That the influence of the Crown has increased, is increasing, and ought to be diminished?
Page 314 - He was prone to superstition, but not to credulity. Though his imagination might incline him to a belief of the marvellous and the mysterious, his vigorous reason examined the evidence with jealousy.
Page 52 - There must, in the first place, be knowledge, there must be materials ;—in the second place, there must be a command of words ;— in the third place, there must be imagination, to place things in such views as they are not commonly seen in ;—and in the fourth place, there must be presence of mind, and a resolution that it is not to be overcome by failures : this last is an essential requisite ; for want of it, many people do not excel in conversation. Now / want it; I throw up the game upon...

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