Remembering Our Past: Studies in Autobiographical Memory

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David C. Rubin
Cambridge University Press, Feb 13, 1999 - Psychology - 448 pages
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The recent attempt to move research in cognitive psychology out of the laboratory makes autobiographical memory appealing, because naturalistic studies can be done while maintaining empirical rigor. Many practical problems fall into the category of autobiographical memory, such as eyewitness testimony, survey research, and clinical syndromes in which there are distortions of memory. This book's scope extends beyond psychology into law, medicine, sociology, and literature. Work on autobiographical memory has matured since David Rubin's Autobiographical Memory appeared in 1986, and the timing is right for a new overview of the topic. Remembering Our Past presents innovative research chapters and general reviews, covering such topics as emotions, eyewitness memory, false memory syndrome, and amnesia. The volume will appeal to graduate students and researchers in cognitive science and psychology.
  

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Contents

Introduction
1
Approaches
17
What is recollective memory?
19
Autobiographical knowledge and autobiographical memories
67
Autobiographical remembering Narrative constraints on objectified selves
94
Accuracy
127
Time in autobiographical memory
129
The pliability of autobiographical memory Misinformation and the false memory problem
157
Depression and the specificity of autobiographical memory
244
Social functions
269
Remembering as communication A family recounts its past
271
Group narrative as a cultural context of autobiography
291
Memories of college The importance of specific educational episodes
318
Development and disruption
339
Remembering recounting and reminiscing The development of autobiographical memory in social context
341
Intersecting meanings of reminiscence in adult development and aging
360

Autobiographical memory in court
180
Emotions
197
Perspective meaning and remembering
199
Emotional events and emotions in autobiographical memories
218
Schizophrenic delusions and the construction of autobiographical memory
384
Subject index
429
Author index
437
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About the author (1999)

David C. Rubin is Juanita M. Kreps Professor of Psychology and Neuroscience at the Duke Institute for Brain Sciences, Duke University. He is a leading researcher in the field of autobiographical memory and the editor of Remembering our Past: Studies in Autobiographical Memory (Cambridge University Press, 1996) and Autobiographical Memory (Cambridge University Press, 1986) among other books.

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