Athens, Thrace, and the Shaping of Athenian Leadership

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Cambridge University Press, Mar 25, 2013 - History - 328 pages
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From the mid-sixth to the mid-fourth century BCE a nexus of connections to Thrace defined the careers of several of Athens' most prominent figures, including Pisistratus, Miltiades, Alcibiades, and Iphicrates. This book explores the importance of Thrace to these individuals and its resulting significance in the political, cultural, and social history of Athens. Thrace was vitally important for Athens thanks to its natural resources and access to strategic waterways, which were essential to a maritime empire, and connections to the area conferred wealth and military influence on certain Athenians and offered them a refuge if they faced political persecution at home. However, Thrace's importance to prominent individuals transcended politics: its culture was also an important draw. Thrace was a world free of Athenian political, social, and cultural constraints - one that bore a striking resemblance to the world of Homeric epic.
  

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Contents

EGALITARIANIsM AMBITION
1
ALCIBIADES
90
A Nexus of Thracian Ties
99
Xenophon
110
Iphicrates
118
Conclusion to Chapters 2 and 3
136
Two Views of Thrace
142
The Liminal Existence of Thracians
149
Helmets
201
Feasting and GiftExchange
208
Religion and Cult
217
The Agon
223
Conclusion
230
Thrace and the Hero of Marathon
238
A Bad Day at Mycalessus
250
Thracian Barbarians Save Athenian Democracy
263

The Athenian Response to Thraces Disciples
157
THE CULTURAL APPEAL OF THRACE FOR
174
Gold Masks
183
VasePainting
191
CHARES AND CHARIDEMUS IN
290
Index
315
Copyright

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About the author (2013)

Matthew A. Sears is Theodore Bedrick Visiting Assistant Professor of Classics at Wabash College in Crawfordsville, Indiana. His articles have appeared in Classical World, Hesperia and Mouseion.

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