Memorable Wars of Scotland (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Nimmo, Hay & Mitchell, 1896 - Battles - 215 pages
0 Reviews
  

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 115 - My age renders my body of no use in battle, and my counsel is despised ; but I leave my two sons and the vassals of Douglas in the field : may old Angus's foreboding prove unfounded...
Page 160 - Melvil, who stood beside her and solemnly confirmed it. An Act of Council was then passed, declaring all the late proceedings by which Moray had become regent, treasonable and of none effect; and a bond drawn up by the nobility for the defence of their sovereign, and her restitution to her crown and kingdom, which, in the enthusiasm of the moment, was signed by nine earls, nine bishops, eighteen lords, twelve abbots and priors, and nearly one hundred barons. But the queen, though encouraged by this...
Page 84 - The riches obtained by the plunder of the English, and the subsequent ransom paid for the multitude of the prisoners, must have been very great. Their exact amount cannot be easily estimated, but some idea of its greatness may be formed by the tone of deep lamentation assumed by the Monk of Malmesbury. " O day of vengeance and of misfortune...
Page 178 - Go," said he, addressing Lindsay, the minister of Leith, " to yonder man in the castle, whom you know I have loved so dearly, and tell him that I have sent you yet once more to warn him, in the name of God, to leave that evil cause. . . . Neither the...
Page 121 - ... high rank ; the remainder being composed of the gentry, the farmers, and landed yeomanry, who disdained to fly when their sovereign and his nobles lay stretched in heaps around them. Amongst the slain were thirteen earls Crawford, Montrose, Huntly, Lennox, Argyle, Errol, Athole, Morton...
Page 121 - Scottish nobles, who threw themselves into a circle round the body and defended it till darkness separated the combatants. At this time Surrey was uncertain of the result of the battle, the remains of the enemy's centre still held the field, Home with his borderers hovered on the left, and the commander wisely allowed neither pursuit nor plunder, but drew off his men and kept a strict watch during the night. When the morning broke, the Scottish artillery were seen standing deserted on the side of...
Page 122 - Lawers, and five peers' eldest sons, besides La Motte the French ambassador, and the secretary of the king. The names of the gentry who fell are too numerous for recapitulation, since there were few families of note in Scotland which did not lose one relative or another, whilst some houses had to weep the death of all. It is from this cause that the sensations of sorrow and national lamentation occasioned by the defeat were peculiarly poignant and lasting ; so that to this day few Scotsmen can hear...
Page 43 - These mean and selfish jealousies were increased by the terror of Edward's military renown, and in many by the fear of losing their English estates ; so that at the very time when an honest love of liberty, and a simultaneous spirit of resistance, could alone have saved Scotland, its nobility deserted it at its utmost need, and refused to act with the only man whose military talents and prosperity were equal to the emergency.
Page 222 - Picture Lessons by the Divine Teacher; or, Illustrations of the Parables of our Lord. By PETER GRANT, DD 15. Nonna: A Story of the Days of Julian the Apostate. By ELLEN PALMER. 16. Philip Walton; or, Light at Last. By the Author of ' Meta Frantz,
Page 80 - Multitudes of the English were drowned when attempting to cross the river Forth. Many, in their flight, fell into the pits, which they seem to have avoided in their first attack, and were there suffocated or slain ; others, who vainly...

Bibliographic information