The 'Eclipse' temperance elocutionist (Google eBook)

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1875
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Page 1 - Be not too tame neither, but let your own discretion be your tutor ; suit the action to the word, the word to the action; with this special observance: that you o'erstep not the modesty of nature ; for anything so overdone is from the purpose of playing, whose end, both at the first and now, was and is, to hold, as 'twere, the mirror up to nature ; to show virtue her own feature, scorn her own image, and the very age and body of the time his form and pressure.
Page 1 - Speak the speech, I pray you, as I pronounced it to you, trippingly on the tongue : but if you mouth it, as many of our players do, I had as lief the town-crier spoke my lines.
Page 73 - That moss-covered vessel I hail as a treasure ; For often, at noon, when returned from the field, I found it the source of an exquisite pleasure — The purest and sweetest that nature can yield. How ardent I seized it, with hands that were glowing ! And quick to the white-pebbled bottom it fell: Then soon, with the emblem of truth overflowing, And dripping with coolness, it rose from the well : The old oaken bucket, the iron-bound bucket, The moss-covered bucket, arose from the well.
Page 82 - Into the starlight Rushing in spray, Happy at midnight, Happy by day ! Ever in motion, Blithesome and cheery, Still climbing heavenward, Never aweary ; — Glad of all weathers, Still seeming best, Upward or downward, Motion thy rest ; — Full of a nature Nothing can tame, Changed every moment...
Page 2 - O, there be players that I have seen play, and heard others praise, and that highly, not to speak it profanely, that, neither having the accent of Christians nor the gait of Christian, pagan, nor man, have so strutted and bellowed that I have thought some of nature's journeymen had made men and not made them well, they imitated humanity so abominably.
Page 1 - Nor do not saw the air too much with your hand, thus; but use all gently: for in the very torrent, tempest, and, as I may say, whirlwind of your passion, you must acquire and beget a temperance, that may give it smoothness.
Page 1 - O; it offends me to the soul, to hear a robustious periwigpated fellow tear a passion to tatters, to very rags, to split the ears of the groundlings ; who, for the most part, are capable of nothing but inexplicable dumb shows and noise : I would have such a fellow whipped for o'er-doing Termagant ; it out-herods Herod : pray you, avoid it.
Page 115 - neath a blow a father dealt, And the cold, proud world's scorn ; Thus struggle on from year to year, Thy sole relief the scalding tear. Go, weep as I have wept, O'er a loved father's fall ; See every cherished promise swept — Youth's sweetness turned to gall ; Hope's faded flowers strewed all the way, That led me up to woman's day.
Page 10 - To charm the fish he never spoke, — Although his voice was fine, He found the most convenient way Was just to drop a line.
Page 1 - But he knew that such indiscriminate prodigality was, to use his own admirable language, " from the purpose of playing, whose end, both at the first and now, was, and is, to hold, as it were, the mirror up to nature.

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