Early Latin America: A History of Colonial Spanish America and Brazil

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Cambridge University Press, Sep 30, 1983 - History - 480 pages
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This book provides a general history of Latin America in the period between the European conquest and the gaining of independence by the Spanish American countries and Brazil (approximately 1492-1825). It is both an introduction for the student at the college level and a provisionally updated synthesis of the quickly changing field for the more experienced reader. The authors' aim is not only to treat colonial Brazil and colonial Spanish America in a single volume, something rarely done, but also to view early Latin America as one unit with a centre and peripheries, all parts of which were characterized by variants of the same kinds of change, regardless of national and imperial borders. The authors integrate both the older and the newer historical literature, seeing legal, institutional, and political phenomena within a social, economic, and cultural context. They incorporate insights from other disciplines and newer techniques of historical research, but eschew jargon or technical concepts. The approach of the book, with its emphasis on broad social and economic trends across large areas and long time periods, does much to throw light on Latin America in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries as well.
  

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Review: Early Latin America: A History of Colonial Spanish America and Brazil (Cambridge Latin American Studies)

User Review  - Chris Gager - Goodreads

I don't think this is the book I partly read but close enough. I found it lying in the middle of the road all wet and beat up. I dried it out and read some of it. Probably a textbook. Very dry of course but the story of exploration and conquest is interesting. I pretty much gave up after that. Read full review

Contents

Iberian ways
3
Functional groupings of society
4
Other principles of social organization
7
Ethnic groups
9
Government
11
The ecclesiastical component
13
Commerce
15
Slavery
17
The New Granadan gold complex
177
Brazilian beginnings
181
From donatary captaincies to royal government
183
Indian and African labor in Brazil
194
Brazil in the sugar age
202
The world that sugar created
204
The African and slavery
215
Merchants and commerce
221

Castile
19
Portugal
22
Portuguese expansion
24
Sugar and commercialagricultural slavery
26
Brazil and Portugals empire
28
Christopher Columbus Genoese
29
Indigenous ways
31
Sedentary peoples
37
Semisedentary peoples
52
Nonsedentary peoples
55
ORIGINS AND EARLY MATURITY
59
From islands to mainland the Caribbean phase and subsequent conquests
61
The course of Caribbean events
62
Spanish city and society on Hispaniola
65
Mechanisms of SpanishIndian interaction
68
Precious metals and their role in the economy
73
Elements of the international maritime tradition
74
The Spanish Caribbean heritage expressed in vocabulary
76
Mechanisms of expansion and the evolution of expeditionary forms
78
Patterns of conquest and resistance
80
The double trajectory of conquest
83
Conquest society central areas
86
The encomienda
92
Commerce and artisanry
96
Mining
100
Officials and practices of government
102
Ecclesiastics
106
Indians
111
Areas of transition
118
Phenomena of conclusion
119
Maturity in the Spanish Indies central areas
122
City government and society
125
Development of the local Spanish economy
132
The international economy
146
Ecclesiastical matters
154
Intellectual life
159
The Indian world
164
New Christians
225
Cities and towns
227
The social fabric
233
Cultural matters
238
Government and society
243
The international context
249
The fringes
253
the Rio de la Plata and southern Brazil
257
The Amazonian fringe
273
A Caribbean variant
282
Frontiers
287
Some comparative aspects
302
REORIENTATION
305
Late colonial times in the Spanish Indies
315
Creole consolidation and metropolitan reaction
322
haciendas Indians and silver mining
327
The east coast revolution
336
The Bourbon reforms
346
The intendancy reform
352
The creation of a military
358
Economic reforms and their implications
362
Brazil in the age of gold and absolutism
369
Minas Gerais
370
The impact of gold
379
The Pombaline reforms
383
Pombaline Brazil
388
Population family and society
397
Epilogue the coming of independence
405
Preindependence stirrings
406
International developments
412
The independence movements
415
Some perspectives on the independence movements
419
Postindependence continuities
424
Bibliography
427
Index
455
Copyright

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About the author (1983)

James Lockhart is Professor of History at the University of California, Los Angeles. His most recent book is "The Nahuas After the Conquest

Stuart B. Schwartz is George Burton Adams Professor of History and Master of Ezra Stiles College at Yale University. He is author or editor of several books, including ###Slaves, Peasants, and Rebels: Reconsidering Brazilian Slavery.#

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