History of the transactions in Scotland, in the years 1715-16, and 1745-46: containing an impartial account of the occurences of these years; together with an authentic detail of the dangers Prince Charles encountered after the battle of Culloden, with a short sketch of his life; interspersed with a variety of anecdotes, never before published, Volume 1 (Google eBook)

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Printed for G. Charles, bookseller, 1817 - Jacobites
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Page 29 - Israel, whose day is come, when iniquity shall have an end, thus saith the Lord God ; Remove the diadem, and take off the crown: this shall not be the same: exalt him that is low, and abase him that is high. I will overturn, overturn, overturn, it: and it shall be no more, until he come whose right it is; and I will give it him.
Page 502 - Do thou, great liberty, inspire our souls, And make our lives in thy possession happy, Or our deaths glorious in thy just defence.
Page 185 - Parliament their famous motion, that an humble address be presented to his Majesty that he would be graciously pleased to remove the Right Honourable Sir Robert Walpole...
Page 186 - subjects dissenting from the Church of England from the penalties of
Page 394 - I shall leave them no reason for complaint, that I have not done the utmost they could expect from me. Let those who forget their duty, and are negligent of their own good, be answerable for the worst that may happen. For me it will be no new thing if I am unfortunate. My whole life, even from my cradle, has shown a constant series of misfortunes ; and I am prepared if so it please God to suffer the threats of my enemies and yours.
Page 186 - Peace, shall unlawfully, and with Force demolish or pull down, or begin to demolish or pull down any Church or Chapel, or any Building for religious Worship certified and registered according to the Statute made in the first Year of the Reign of the late King William and Queen Mary, ... or any Dwelling-house, Barn, Stable or other Outhouse, that then every such demolishing, or pulling down, or beginning to demolish, or pull down, shall be adjudged Felony without Benefit of Clergy...
Page 58 - Majesty the several rates and duties hereinafter mentioned; and do most humbly beseech your Majesty that it may be enacted, and be it enacted by the king's most excellent Majesty, by and with the advice and consent of the Lords Spiritual and Temporal...
Page 154 - ... commons to consider the king's proclamation for calling a new parliament, sir William Whitelock, member for the university of Oxford, boldly declared it was unprecedented and unwarrantable. Being called upon to explain himself, he made an apology. Nevertheless, sir William Wyndham rising up said, the proclamation was not only unprecedented and unwarrantable, but even of dangerous consequence to the very being of parliaments. When challenged to justify his charge, he observed, that every member...
Page 149 - resentment we observe that the Pretender still resides " in Lorraine ; and that he has the presumption, by de" clarations from thence, to stir up your Majesty's subjects to rebellion. But that which raises the utmost " indignation of your Commons is, that it appears therein " that his hopes were built upon the measures that had " been taken for some time past in Great Britain. It " shall be our business to trace out those measures " whereon he placed his hopes, and to bring the authors " of them...
Page 218 - Be of good courage, and let us play the men for our people, and for the cities of our God : and the LORD do that which seemeth him good.

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