History of the Seventh Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry in the War of the Rebellion of the Southern States Against Constitutional Authority: 1861-1865. With Description of Battles, Army Movements, Hospital Life, and Incidents of the Camp, by Officers and Privates; and a Comprehensive Introduction of the Moral and Political Forces which Precipitated the War of Secession Upon the People of the United States (Google eBook)

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authority of the regimental association, 1890 - Massachusetts - 320 pages
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Page 204 - Potomac proceed forthwith to organize that part of the said army destined to enter upon active operations (including the reserve, but excluding the troops to be left in the fortifications about Washington) into four army corps, to be commanded according to seniority of rank, as follows: First Corps to consist of four divisions, and to be commanded by Major-General I.
Page 205 - That this order be executed with such promptness and dispatch as not to delay the commencement of the operations already directed to be undertaken by the Army of the Potomac.
Page 204 - That the Major-General commanding the Army of the Potomac proceed forthwith to organize that part of said army destined to enter upon active operations, (including the reserve, but excluding the troops to be left in the fortifications about Washington,) into four army corps, to be commanded according to seniority of rank, as follows : First Corps, to consist of four divisions, and to be commanded by Maj.-Gen.
Page 205 - NP Banks; divisions, Williams and Shields. The cavalry regiments attached to divisions will for the present remain so. Subsequent orders will provide for these regiments, as well as for the reserve artillery, regular infantry, and regular cavalry. Arrangements will be made to unite the divisions of each army corps as promptly as possible. The commanders of divisions will at once report in person, or, where that is impossible, by letter to the commander of their army corps. By command of Major-General...
Page 23 - Ordered at once to move up into the front line, now needing reinforcement, this change brought it into the gap created by the Confederate charge, and continuing its advance it struck the flank of the hostile force which was sweeping away the Union right, and aided by the Fifth Maine battery, which enfiladed the enemy's line with canister, at once turned the tide. The enemy retreated, the line was re-established, the fugitives were gathered from the woods in which they had taken refuge, while the...
Page 62 - It was decided to push our lines to the other side of these woods, in order to enable us to ascertain the nature of the ground, and to place Generals...
Page 17 - Aug. 20, 1847, for gallant and meritorious conduct in the battles of Contreras and Churubusco.
Page 137 - Harlow who commanded the regiment after the wounding of Colonel Johns, I mainly attribute this fortunate result. Colonel Harlow proved himself a hero, as this was a charge not exceeded in brilliancy and daring by any operation of the war.
Page 117 - Since that time it has participated in all the important battles of Virginia and Maryland, and on all occasions it has behaved with the most distinguished gallantry and determination. Called upon both at Ball's Bluff and at Antietam, to endure the terrific loss of more than one half of its men engaged, it exhibited a courage and fidelity more than worthy of veteran troops, for it was worthy of the holy cause which had drawn its men from their peaceful homes.
Page 137 - EXCELLENCY JOHN A. ANDREW, Governor of Massachusetts. SIR: Permit me to call your attention to the excellent conduct of the Massachusetts regiments under my command during the late operations of the Sixth Corps. The Seventh Massachusetts stormed the Heights of Fredericksburg in columns without firing a shot and suffered severely. To Lieutenant-Colonel Harlow who commanded the regiment after the wounding of Colonel Johns, I mainly attribute this fortunate result.

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