Ego Trip's: Book of Rap Lists

Front Cover
Sacha Jenkins
Macmillan, Dec 3, 1999 - Music - 352 pages
19 Reviews
Ego Trip's Book of Rap Lists is more popular than racism!  Hip hop is huge, and it's time someone wrote it all down. And got it all right. With over 25 aggregate years of interviews, and virtually every hip hop single, remix and album ever recorded at their disposal, the highly respected Ego Trip staff are the ones to do it. The Book of Rap Lists runs the gamut of hip hop information. This is an exhaustive, indispensable and completely irreverant bible of true hip hip knowledge.
  

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Review: Ego Trip's Book of Rap Lists

User Review  - Trevor - Goodreads

This is my favorite reference book EVER. I've dog-eared it pretty good from all the nerding-out I've done with it. The writers must be my age because we have very similar taste in rap music. SUCH a fun read! Read full review

Review: Ego Trip's Book of Rap Lists

User Review  - Bill Shannon - Goodreads

I got this book in the mail on a Saturday in 2000 and spent the entire day ignoring my girlfriend and reading it cover to cover. Not only is it a magnificent gonzo pastiche of hip hop artifacts ... Read full review

Contents

III
19
IV
20
V
21
VI
22
VII
26
IX
27
XI
28
XII
30
CLIX
168
CLXIII
169
CLXIV
170
CLXV
172
CLXVI
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CLXVII
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CLXIX
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CLXX
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XIII
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XIV
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XV
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XVI
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XVIII
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XIX
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XX
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XXII
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XXIV
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XXV
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XXVI
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XXVII
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XXVIII
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XXIX
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XXX
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XXXII
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XXXIII
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XXXV
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XXXVII
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XXXVIII
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XL
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XLI
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XLII
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XLIV
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XLV
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XLVI
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XLVIII
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L
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LII
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LIII
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LV
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LVII
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LVIII
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LXI
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LXII
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LXIV
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LXV
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LXVI
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LXVII
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LXVIII
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LXIX
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LXX
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LXXI
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LXXII
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LXXV
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LXXVIII
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LXXXI
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LXXXII
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LXXXIII
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LXXXV
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LXXXVII
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LXXXVIII
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XC
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XCI
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XCIII
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XCIV
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XCV
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XCVI
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XCVII
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XCVIII
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XCIX
114
C
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CI
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CII
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CV
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CVIII
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CIX
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CXI
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CXII
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CXVI
127
CXVII
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CXVIII
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CXX
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CXXIV
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CXXV
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CXXVI
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CXXVIII
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CXXIX
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CXXXIII
138
CXXXIV
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CXXXV
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CXXXVI
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CXXXVII
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CXXXVIII
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CXXXIX
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CXLI
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CXLII
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CXLIII
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CXLIV
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CXLVI
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CXLVII
156
CXLIX
157
CLI
158
CLII
159
CLIII
160
CLIV
161
CLV
162
CLVI
163
CLVII
166
CLVIII
167
CLXXII
178
CLXXIII
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CLXXIV
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CLXXV
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CLXXVII
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CLXXVIII
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CLXXX
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CLXXXII
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CLXXXIII
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CLXXXIV
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CLXXXVI
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CLXXXVII
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CLXXXVIII
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CLXXXIX
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CXCII
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CXCIV
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CXCVI
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CXCVII
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CXCVIII
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CCI
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CCII
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CCIII
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CCIV
213
CCV
214
CCVI
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CCIX
216
CCXII
217
CCXIII
218
CCXIV
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CCXVII
223
CCXVIII
224
CCXIX
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CCXXII
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CCXXV
228
CCXXVII
229
CCXXIX
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CCXXX
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CCXXXII
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CCXXXIV
233
CCXXXVII
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CCXXXVIII
238
CCXXXIX
240
CCXLI
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CCXLII
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CCXLIII
243
CCXLIV
244
CCXLV
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CCXLVII
247
CCXLVIII
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CCXLIX
251
CCLII
254
CCLIV
255
CCLV
256
CCLVI
257
CCLVII
258
CCLVIII
259
CCLIX
260
CCLXI
261
CCLXII
262
CCLXIII
263
CCLXIV
264
CCLXVI
265
CCLXVII
268
CCLXX
269
CCLXXI
270
CCLXXII
271
CCLXXIII
272
CCLXXIV
273
CCLXXV
274
CCLXXVIII
275
CCLXXIX
276
CCLXXX
278
CCLXXXI
280
CCLXXXV
281
CCLXXXVI
282
CCLXXXVII
283
CCLXXXIX
284
CCXCII
285
CCXCIV
286
CCXCV
288
CCXCVI
292
CCXCVII
293
CCXCVIII
294
CCC
295
CCCII
296
CCCV
297
CCCVI
298
CCCVII
299
CCCIX
300
CCCX
301
CCCXII
302
CCCXV
303
CCCXVI
305
CCCXVII
306
CCCXVIII
311
CCCXIX
312
CCCXX
338
CCCXXI
352
Copyright

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About the author (1999)

Sacha Jenkins-much like rap great KRS One-is hip hip. Sachy-Sach, his sister Dominiqe, and
their artistically inclined, Haitian-born mom-dukes, Monart, moved to Astoria, Queens, NY from
Silver Springs, MD in the summer of 1977. Their Philadelphia, PA-reared, filmmaking/Emmy
Award-winning pop-dukes, Horace was already living in NYC at the time (100th Street & Central
Park West, to be exact...blocks away from the infamous Rock Steady Park). During the school
week, young Sacha spent his post three o'clock days playing stickball and skelly. Then...
1980: Sacha was blessed by an elder with an instrument of destruction that would forever change
his life. "PK," a local subway scrawler with some inter-borough celebrity, handed the young boy
a very juiced-up Pilot magic marker.

1988: Inspired by a the International Graffiti Times (a rag published by aerosol legend Phase 2
and David Schmidlap), Sacha would put together Graphic Scenes & X-plicit Language-a zine
dedicated to, yep, graf. And poetry. And anti-Gulf War rants. And humor. And towards the end,
in 1991, music.
1992: Beat Down, America's first hip hop newspaper, is launched by Sacha and a childhood
friend have a falling out. Bye bye, Black bird.
June, 1994: Ego Trip magazine is born.
1996: Sacha writes for Vibe, Rolling Stone, and Spin. He gets a Writer-At-Large then Music
Editor gig at Vibe.
Present: In his spare time, Sacha likes to play guitar, collect Planet of the Apes action figures and
listen to rap that isn't wack. He's a Leo.

In the summer of 1992, armed with his worthless LaGuardia Community College Associate Arts
degree, mulatto-born Elliot Wilson attempted to connect with The Source to no avail. Frustrated
20and full of half-black rage, Wilson vowed to one day show his smarmy colleagues in the world
of hip hop journalism what a tragic mistake they had made.

Befriending fellow W.C. Bryant High School alum Sacha Jenkins and L.C.C. student Haji
Akhigbade, Wilson became the Music Editor of the duo's burgeoning rap newspaper, Beat
Down. After the trio disbanded in the fall of '93, Wilson encouraged Jenkins to give the
publishing game another shot and the seasoned salt-and-pepper duo began to conceptualize
Ego Trip.

Wilson soon realized, however, that one cannot eat off props alone. When not contributing
toward ground-breaking. When not contributing toward ground-breaking Ego Trip scriptures,
he actively freelanced for Vibe, Rap Pages, Rap Sheet, Time Out New York and Paper. In 1995,
he endured a brief-but-successful stint as an Associate Editor at CMJ New Music Report where
he solidified the indie rock trade rag's hip hop coverage.

But it was in 1996 that he would enjoy a particularly sweet payback when he was wooed from
CMJ to become The Source's Music Editor. During his two-year tenure, he helped propel the
already established publication to the country's top-selling music title.

From Q-borough underachiever to Big Willie publishing mogul and now author, Elliot Jesse
Wilson Jr. is a living testament that dreams can and do come true.

Toiling for years as a truck-driving production assistant on the New York commercial filmmaking
scene, New York University graduate Chairman Mao needed direction. An aspiring DJ, his
addiction to acquiring wax had depleted his bank account. But in 1992, his chance meeting with an
ambitious young publishing entrepreneur/film intern named Sacha Jenkins introduced an
absurd solution to these fiscal woes-entering the world of music journalism! Mao began
contributing to Jenkins' Beat Down magazine in exchange for complimentary promotional
copies of hip hop records. He couldn't believe his luck.

Mao eventually exploited this writing scam so well that he actually began earning rent money
with his new vocation. While becoming a fundamental cog within Jenkins' and partner Elliot
Wilson's next publishing foray, Ego Trip, Mao enlightened Rolling Stone, Spin, Entertainment
Weekly and Vibe with his critical musings. Amongst his most noteworthy assignments: his
guest editorship for Rap Pages acclaimed DJ Issue in April of 1996 and is profile of The
Notorious B.I.G. in April of 1997 for the cover of The Source shortly before the rapper's
untimely death.

Currently Ego Trip's Editor-in-Chief and a Vibe Writer-at-Large, Mao still can't believe he
possesses a job that doesn't require him to sweep floors and chauffeur ad agency assholes.
When not clocking long-but-gratifying hours at ET's NYC HQ, he can be found in a record
store near you digging for archival additions to his now 20,000-piece strong record library.

Gabriel Alvarez was a long-haired, 20-year-old, L.A.-born Mexican with glasses trying to find a
job in 1991. The odds were against him. Nobody wanted him. The only alternative? Intern for
gratis at the latest magazine acquisition of Hustler publishing magnate Larry Flynt. Film Threat
was a cool, anti-Hollywood, punk rock-type rag that gave the mainstream film press the kind of
kick in the ass it needed. Alvarez quickly elevated to the position of Associate Editor.

Two years later, however, it was time to move on and Alvarez began working for another Flynt
publication. Rap Pages was a hip hop mag that needed new creative energies to help it realize its
potential. As Managing Editor, Alvarez expelled plenty of blood, sweat and tears and featured
special graffiti, DJ and breakdance issues that intrigued a growing readership. Another three
years later, though, it was time to roll the dice again.

His next job opportunity came in 1996 in the enticing form of Ego Trip, and amazingly creative
magazine outta New York City, that made him an offer he couldn't refuse: a Managing Editor
position demanding lots of hard work but no money. Displaying the sage decision-making skills
that have guided his entire career, Alvarez immediately packs his bags and heads for the
Rotten Apple. He begins freelancing extensively for The Source and Vibe. His status as an
important critical voice grows. He even cuts his hair. He couldn't be happier. Or more broke.

Alternately known as Asparagus, Prima, Gor-gee, Half-Black, Kinda-Black, Brent Rollins or
Milton Reese (depending on the time of day), Brent Rollins, ET's full-time Art Director and
part-time scribe, is the original "Afrocentric Asian, half man/half-amazin'."

But whatever he's called, he's called often by the entertainment biz. Before graduating from
UCLA with a BFA, Rollins had the fortunate opportunity to cut his teeth designing logos for films
like Spike Lee's Mo Better Blues and John Singleton's Boyz N The Hood as well as interning
at Fattal and Collins Design & Advertising. He punctuated his college career by creating graphics
for a FOX Network variety show, revamping the identity for TV's historic Soul Train and
studying for a French exam all during his senior finals week. C'est incroyable!

However, it was his subsequent two-year bid (1994-1996) as Art Director for Rap Pages magazine
which honed Rollins' talents. Since then, he's serviced clients such as Miramax Films, ICM, A&M,
Mo' Wax and SoleSide Records. Along the way, he's also created art for the Pharcyde, The
Notorious B.I.G., Gang Starr, Sir Menelik, Black Star, and The Refugee Project charity
organization. Between maintaining the 24/7 grind that has put food on his table and made his mom
proud, the design veteran continues to champion the maligned and forgotten genre of "weirdo-
rap." Big time.

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