The Age of Milton (Google eBook)

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G. Bell, 1897 - English literature - 254 pages
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Page 23 - There entertain him all the saints above In solemn troops, and sweet societies That sing, and singing in their glory move, And wipe the tears for ever from his eyes.
Page 50 - To hoarse or mute, though fallen on evil days, On evil days though fallen, and evil tongues. In darkness, and with dangers compassed round, And solitude ; yet not alone, while thou Visit'st my slumbers nightly, or when Morn Purples the East. Still govern thou my song, Urania, and fit audience find, though few.
Page 114 - My gazing soul would dwell an hour, And in those weaker glories spy Some shadows of eternity; Before I taught my tongue to wound My Conscience with a sinful sound, Or had the black art to dispense A several sin to every sense; But felt through all this fleshly dress Bright shoots of everlastingness.
Page 58 - Their dread commander ; he above the rest, In shape and gesture proudly eminent, Stood like a tower : his form had not yet lost All her original brightness ; nor appear'd Less than arch-angel ruin'd, and th...
Page 23 - Alas! what boots it with incessant care To tend the homely, slighted, shepherd's trade, And strictly meditate the thankless Muse? Were it not better done, as others use, To sport with Amaryllis in the shade, Or with the tangles of Neaera's hair?
Page 9 - Yet be it less or more, or soon or slow, It shall be still in strictest measure even To that same lot, however mean or high, Toward which time leads me, and the will of Heaven ; All is, if I have grace to use it so,. As ever in my great Taskmaster's eye.
Page 111 - O thou undaunted daughter of desires! By all thy dower of lights and fires, By all the eagle in thee, all the dove, By all thy lives and deaths of love, By thy large draughts of intellectual day, And by thy thirsts of love more large than they, By all thy...
Page 124 - ON A GIRDLE THAT which her slender waist confined Shall now my joyful temples bind : No monarch but would give his crown His arms might do what this has done.
Page 101 - Out upon it, I have loved Three whole days together! And am like to love three more, If it prove fair weather. Time shall moult away his wings Ere he shall discover In the whole wide world again Such a constant lover.
Page 24 - ... from his eyes. Now, Lycidas, the shepherds weep no more ; Henceforth thou art the Genius of the shore In thy large recompense, and shalt be good To all that wander in that perilous flood. Thus sang the uncouth swain to the oaks and rills, While the still morn went out with sandals gray ; He touch'd the tender stops of various quills, With eager thought warbling his Doric lay...

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