Bride of Lammermoor - Peveril of the peak (Google eBook)

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Robert Cadell, Edinburgh; and Whittaker & Company London., 1833
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Page 448 - There's such divinity doth hedge a king, That treason can but peep to what it would, Acts little of his will.
Page 211 - The dews of summer night did fall ; The moon, sweet regent of the -sky, Silver'd the walls of Cumnor Hall, And many an oak that grew thereby. Now nought was heard beneath the skies, The sounds of busy life were still, * Save an unhappy lady's sighs, . That issued from that lonely pile.
Page 7 - If a man vow a vow unto the LORD, or swear an oath to bind his soul with a bond; he shall not break his word, he shall do according to all that proceedeth out of his mouth.
Page 185 - Lifted her up, a weary weight, Over the threshold of the gate : Then the lady rose again, And moved, as she were not in pain. So free from danger, free from fear, They cross'd the court : right glad they were. And Christabel devoutly cried To the lady by her side ; ' Praise we the Virgin all divine Who hath rescued thee from thy distress!' 'Alas, alas!' said Geraldine, ' I cannot speak for weariness.
Page 212 - I'm told, is beauty's throne, Where every lady's passing rare, That Eastern flowers, that shame the sun, Are not so glowing, not so fair. "Then, Earl, why didst thou leave the beds Where roses and where lilies vie, To seek a primrose, whose pale shades Must sicken when those gauds are by? '"Mong rural beauties I was one, Among the fields wild flowers are fair; Some country swain might me have won, And thought my beauty passing rare.
Page 80 - ... than exalted by an attempt to reward virtue with temporal prosperity. Such is not the recompense which Providence has deemed worthy of suffering merit ; and it is a dangerous and fatal doctrine to teach young persons, the most common readers of romance, that rectitude of conduct and of principle are either naturally allied with, or adequately rewarded by, the gratification of our passions, or attainment of our wishes. In a word, if a virtuous and self-denied character is dismissed with temporal...
Page 418 - Here lies our sovereign lord the King, Whose word no man relies on ; Who never said a foolish thing, And never did a wise one.
Page 180 - Sir this is a busy day with us, we cannot hear you, it is Robin Hood's day. The parish are gone abroad to gather for Robin Hood. I pray you let them not.
Page 131 - But though such an unconnected course of adventures is what most frequently occurs in nature, yet the province of the romance writer being artificial, there is more required from him than a mere compliance with the simplicity of reality...
Page 211 - No lark more blithe, no flower more gay ; And, like the bird that haunts the thorn, So merrily sung the livelong day. "If that my beauty is but small, Among court ladies all despised, Why didst thou rend it from that hall, Where, scornful earl, it well was prized?

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