St. Johnstoun; or, John, earl of Gowrie [purporting to be ed. by Peregrine Rover, really written by E. Logan]. (Google eBook)

Front Cover
1823
0 Reviews
  

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Selected pages

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 278 - As a beam o'er the face of the waters may glow While the tide runs in darkness and coldness below, So the cheek may be tinged with a warm sunny smile, Though the cold heart to ruin runs darkly the while...
Page 278 - As a beam o'er the face of the waters may glow, While the tide runs in darkness and coldness below, So the cheek may be tinged with a warm sunny smile, Though the cold heart to ruin runs darkly the while.
Page 125 - Love various minds does variously inspire : It stirs in gentle bosoms gentle fire, Like that of incense on the altar laid ; But raging flames tempestuous souls invade: A fire which every windy passion blows, With pride it mounts, or with revenge it glows.
Page 259 - Was ever woman in this humour woo'd ? Was ever woman in this humour won ? I'll have her, but I will not keep her long.
Page 44 - Our purpose is on the seventh day of June, If weather serve, and we have rest and peace, We shall be seen into our playing place, In good array, about the hour of seven. Of thriftiness, that day, I pray you cease, But ordain us good drink against alleven. Fail not to be upon the Castlehill, Beside the place where we propose to play ; With good stark wine, your flaggons, see you fill, And had yourselves the merriest that you may.
Page 1 - For natural affection soon doth cease, And quenched is with Cupid's greater flame ; But faithful friendship doth them both suppress, And them with mastering discipline doth tame, Through thoughts aspiring to eternal fame. For as the soul doth rule the earthly mass, And all the service of the body frame ; So love of soul doth love of body pass, No less than perfect gold surmounts the meanest brass.
Page 49 - Dream," from the appropriateness of the place to its general scenery, and the partiality of her Majesty for the plays of Shakspeare. The Amazonian Queen, and enamoured Duke, stepped forward on the turf, and the charge of the latter, which was spoken with much animation, to " Stir up the Athenian youth to merriment, Awake the pert and nimble spirit of mirth, And turn melancholy forth to funerals...
Page 91 - tis done all words are idle Words from me are vainer still ; But the thoughts we cannot bridle Force their way without the will. . Fare thee well! thus disunited, Torn from every nearer tie, Sear'd in heart, and lone, and blighted, More than this I scarce can die.
Page 213 - Curse on my stars ! Gar. Nay, in the name of grace, Restrain this sinful passion ; all's not lost In this one single woman.

Bibliographic information