The Politics of Fertility Control: Family Planning and Abortion Policies in the American States

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Chatham House Publishers, 2001 - Political Science - 197 pages
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In this groundbreaking work on American public policy and human fertility control, policies and practices of the 70s, 80s, and 90s are reviewed and analyzed in each of the fifty states. Arguing that morality politics have helped make fertility policies contentious and complex, McFarlane and Meier conclude that current policies are inadequate for addressing unintended pregnancy and even contribute to high abortion rates. The authors offer alternative public policy designed to be more effective in the future.

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Contents

A Historical Overview
20
An Intergovernmental Labyrinth
39
Abortion Policy
62
Copyright

7 other sections not shown

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About the author (2001)

Kenneth J. Meier is the Charles H. Gregory Chair in Liberal Arts and Distinguished Professor of Political Science at Texas A&M University. He is also Professor of Public Management in the Cardiff School of Business, Cardiff University (Wales). He is a former editor of the AMERICAN JOURNAL OF POLITICAL SCIENCE (1994-1997), a former associate editor of THE JOURNAL OF POLITICS (1991-1994), and the JOURNAL OF PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION RESEARCH AND THEORY (2000-2009). He served as the president of the Southwest Political Science Association; the American Political Science Associations sections on State Politics and Policy, Public Policy, and Public Administration; the Public Management Research Association; and the Midwest Political Science Association. In 2006, he received the John Gaus Award for career contributions to public administration scholarship; and in 2010, the C. Dwight Waldo Award from the American Society for Public Administration. He currently lives with the love of his life, Diane Jones Meier, in Bryan, Texas, and spends his free time comparing the merits of California zinfandels with Australian Shirazes.

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