Travel Writing and Empire: Postcolonial Theory in Transit

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Steven H. Clark
Zed Books, 1999 - Social Science - 264 pages
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Travel writing has become central to postcolonial studies; this book provides a comprehensive introduction to the genre. It combines detailed evaluations of major contemporary models of analysis--new historicism, travelling theory, and post-colonial studies--with a series of specific studies detailing the complicity of the genre with a history of violent incursion. These explore: "Othering" discourses--of cannibalism and infanticide; the production of colonial knowledge--geographic, medicinal, zoological; the role of sexual anxiety in the construction of the gendered travelling body; the interplay between imperial and domestic spheres; reappropriation of alien discourse by indigenous cultures. The book resists the temptation to think in terms of a simple monolithic Eurocentrism and offers a more complex reading of texts produced before, during and after periods of imperial ascendancy. In doing so, it provides a more nuanced account of the hegemonic functions of travel-writing.
  

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User Review  - wandering_star - LibraryThing

Interesting chapter on two books on Turkey by Lady Mary Wortley Montague (1860s) and Lady Curzon (1880s) - the first sympathetic & understanding, the second condemning lazy and uncivilized Turks. The ... Read full review

Contents

Acknowledgements
1
Freud on Vacation
31
Cliffords Malinowski
45
wonder 4 9 12
46
Zapatista rebellion
54
Bhabha Postcolonial Theory
63
The Discourse of Cannibalism in Early Modern Travel
83
Zizek Slavoj
84
Changing Visions of Turkey
113
Infanticide and Savagery
129
Travel Writing and Nature Writing
164
A Postcolonial Travelogue
185
Connoisseur of Exile Exile as Connoisseur
195
Recent British Travel Writing
212
Bibliography
232
Index
256

The Legacy of Hakluyt
100

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About the author (1999)

Clark is Visiting Fellow at the School of Advanced Study, University of London.

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