The Bench and Bar of New-York: Containing Biographical Sketches of Eminent Judges, and Lawyers of the New-York Bar, Incidents of the Important Trials in which They Were Engaged, and Anecdotes Connected with Their Professional, Political and Judicial Career, Volume 1 (Google eBook)

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Diossy, 1870 - Judges - 779 pages
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Page 536 - Judge, before whom all hearts are open, and from whom no secrets are hid.
Page 559 - AH ! who can tell how hard it is to climb The steep where Fame's proud temple shines afar ; Ah ! who can tell how many a soul sublime Has felt the influence of malignant star, And waged with Fortune an eternal war...
Page 83 - There is a Divinity that shapes our ends rough hew them as we may.
Page 224 - ... the principles of the drama to a new examination. I am almost frighted at my own temerity; and when I estimate the fame and the strength of those that maintain the contrary opinion, am ready to sink down in reverential silence ; as ^Eneas withdrew from the defence of Troy, when he saw Neptune shaking the wall, and Juno heading the besiegers.
Page 445 - Nor do not saw the air too much with your hand, thus; but use all gently: for in the very torrent, tempest, and (as I may say) whirlwind of your passion, you must acquire and beget a temperance, that may give it smoothness. O, it offends me to the soul, to hear a robustious periwig-pated fellow tear a passion to tatters, to very rags, to split the ears of the groundlings...
Page 105 - In many poems there is more of truth than in many histories and philosophic theories. The fictions of genius are often the vehicles of the sublimest verities, and its flashes often open new regions of thought, and throw new light on the mysteries of our being.
Page 536 - Undefined in its slope of roof, height of shaft, breadth of arch, or disposition of ground plan, it can shrink into a turret, expand into a hall, coil into a staircase, or spring into a spire, with undegraded grace and unexhausted energy...
Page 268 - How charming is divine Philosophy! Not harsh and crabbed, as dull fools suppose, But musical as is Apollo's lute, And a perpetual feast of nectar'd sweets, Where no crude surfeit reigns.
Page 2 - Thackeray, one of his masters, was wont to say of him, that he was a boy of so active a mind, that if he were left naked and friendless on Salisbury Plain, he would, nevertheless, find the road to fame and riches.
Page 515 - You see, sweet maid, we marry A gentler scion to the wildest stock, And make conceive a bark of baser kind By bud of nobler race. This is an art Which does mend nature change it rather; but The art itself is nature.

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