Estonia: Identity and Independence (Google eBook)

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Jean-Jacques Subrenat
Rodopi, Jan 1, 2004 - History - 310 pages
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In the span of only seventy years, Estonia first proclaimed its independence, was occupied and deprived of its sovereignty, saw many of its citizens deported, and yet managed to recover its independence. How did this small nation keep its language and traditions alive during half a century of occupation, and how did it maintain such a vivid sense of identity? For the first time in English, this book gives a comprehensive view of the events which shaped the destiny of contemporary Estonia. The Editor, Jean-Jacques Subrenat, has called upon an unusually broad spectrum of the best experts (in history, archeology, political science, genetics, literature), but also on some of the leaders who took part in the rebuilding of Estonia, to offer more than a history, rather a unique testimony on a nation reborn. Estonia: Identity and Independence provides rare insight into the many aspects of a country whose location in Northern Europe, within the European Union, and as a NATO ally, but also as a close neighbour of Russia, deserves the attention of scholars, journalists, and informed readers today. This volume includes a thorough chronology of Estonia (from prehistory to accession to the European Union), and a brief c.v. of each co-author. Estonia: Identity and Independence is also available in three other languages (A. Bertricau is the pen-name of Jean-Jacques Subrenat, the initiator and Editor of this book): Estonian: 1st and 2nd edition: A. Bertricau, "Eesti identiteet ja iseseisvus," published by Avita in Tallinn, 2001 and 2002; Russian: A. Bertricau, "Samoopredelenie i nezavissimost' Estonii," published by Avita in Tallinn, August 2001; French: A. Bertricau, "Estonie, identite et independance," published by L'Harmattan in Paris, November 2001.
  

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Contents

From the Origins to the Midl9th Century ll
13
Andrei Hvostov Mart Laar Harri Tiido Historical Myth
35
Margus Laidre From the Reformation to National
65
EaJansen The National Awakening of the Estonian Nation
83
The Soviet Period l940l988
137
Andres Tarand The Soviet Period
153
Jaak Allik The Strong People of Kalev Remained
167
Raima Raag The National Identity and Culture
179
AinoLepik von Wiren An Opinion
217
Mart Laar The Restoration of Independence in Estonia
225
Tunne Kelam An Opinion
239
Kiillo Arjakas Reflections on the Late l980s and Early
245
Rein Raud The Conditions for a Multicultural Estonia
257
Sergei Ivanov Jaan Kaplinski Mart Nutt David Vseviov
269
Jiiri Luik JeanJacques Subrenat Harri Tiido
281
CoAuthors
293

Toomas Hendrik lives An Opinion
199
An Opinion
211
Chronology compiled by Lore Listra
299
Copyright

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Page 6 - A nation is a soul, a spiritual principle. Two things, which in truth are but one, constitute this soul or spiritual principle. One lies in the past, one in the present. One is the possession in common of a rich legacy of memories; the other is present,day consent, the desire to live together, the will to perpetuate the value of the heritage that one has received in an undivided form.
Page 6 - One is the possession in common of a rich legacy of memories; the other is present-day consent, the desire to live together, the will to perpetuate the value of the heritage that one has received in an undivided form ... The nation, like the individual, is the culmination of a long past of endeavours, sacrifice and devotion.
Page 6 - It presupposes a past; it is summarized, however, in the present by a tangible fact, namely, consent, the clearly expressed desire to continue a common life.
Page 6 - The nation, like the individual, is the culmination of a long past of endeavours, sacrifice, and devotion. Of all cults, that of the ancestors is the most legitimate, for the ancestors have made us what we are. A heroic past, great men, glory (by which I understand genuine glory), this is the social capital upon which one bases a national idea.
Page 6 - We are what you were; we will be what you are' - is, in its simplicity, the abridged hymn of every patrie.
Page 6 - Let us not abandon the fundamental principle that man is a reasonable and moral being, before he is cooped up in such and such a language, before he is a member of such and such a race, before he belongs to such and such a culture. Before French, German, or Italian culture there is human culture.

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