Lost Dorsai

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Penguin Group (USA) Incorporated, 1981 - Fiction - 287 pages
7 Reviews
There are many legends on the planet of the Dorsai, the breeding ground for heroes. Here are two of them. Lost Dorsai: The New Dorsai Companion contains the Hugo Award winning novella, Lost Dorsai, and Dickson's classic short story "Warrior." Plus, the New Dorsai Companion contains, for the first time ever, an all new Concordance of the Childe Cycle--a roadmap of Dickson's massive and brilliant creation. The Concordance will let you know not only in which books or stories a person or place is mentioned, but will give you a brief history or biography that explains their significance in the Cycle. It's a Who's Who of the future--and no science fiction reader should be without it.

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Review: Lost Dorsai (Childe Cycle #6)

User Review  - Matt - Goodreads

I was a bit surprised by the outcome. I suppose you know something is going to happen, it is the way all of the Childe Cycle has been. This book really doesn't let on to what might happen though. Also ... Read full review

Review: Lost Dorsai (Childe Cycle #6)

User Review  - Norman Felchle - Goodreads

I'll admit I bought this for the incredible Fernando Fernandez illustrations, but, one day I was looking for some SF to read and this did win the Hugo award...so... It was heavy on politics and ... Read full review

Contents

Section 1
7
Section 2
69
Section 3
76
Copyright

10 other sections not shown

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About the author (1981)

A naturalized American who was born in Canada in 1923, Gordon Rupert Dickson is a popular science fiction writer. Dickson graduated from the University of Minnesota in 1948 and made his home in Minneapolis. Among his many novels, especially notable is Soldier, Ask Not, which won the Hugo Award in 1965. For many years, Dickson's most engrossing project was his Childe Cycle, a series of novels about humanity's evolutionary potential, which included a group of futuristic books that are popularly known as the Dorsai Cycle. Dickson also wrote hundreds of short stories and novelettes including Call Him Lord, for which he received a Nebula Award in 1966.

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