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2010-2011 Environmental Science student:
Jared Diamond possesses the rare combination of expertise in evolutionary biology, a diverse knowledge of history, and a compelling writing style. He takes on
an enormous time period spanning several continents and is able to compactly highlight key events and ideas. I think that this book is highly relevant and important to read to understand different cultures and shaping forces of the modern world. Diamond addresses controversial ideas, such as the innate genetic superiority, and tries to offer objective, scientific explanations. Although the language was a little hard to get through at first, Diamond takes care to avoid many technical details and present overarching themes and critical points. The book is rather long and dense, but I found it to be a rewarding and enlightening read. This book is unique in that it combines the fields of history and science in an accessible way for a general audience, so I would recommend it to future students. 

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Jared Diamond is the most politically correct scientist I have ever read. He prostrates himself to all non Europeans to gain their favor and sell his books. I tired reading Germs, Guns and Steel again last night but I keep running into this nauseating PC stuff that keeps me from moving forward.
Page 19 - describes one explanation that suggests that the Europeans that settled Australia built a literate
industrialized society primarily because they were fundamentally different -- "to establish that the difference between Aboriginal Australian and European societies arose from difference between the people themselves. Then he says
"The objection to such racist explanations is not just that they are loathsome,
but also that they are wrong."
But one page over on page 21 he states "My perspective
on the controversy comes from 33 years of working with New Guineans in their
own intact societies. From the very
beginning of my work with New Guineans in their own intact societies. From the very beginning of my work with New
Guineans, they impressed me as being on the average more intelligent, more
alert, more expressive, and more interested in things and people around them than
the average European or American is."
So if we take the position that Europeans are better, we are racists but
if we take the position (that is, agree with Diamond) that New Guineans are
better it is not racist. How can people sit by and not be upset with this concept. Why is it ok to be a racist toward whites but not toward others. Am I the only one that gets worked up over this nonsense?
 

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Truly amazing..
Go out and read it; it will change your life.

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After reading 380 pages of this great book full of flaws, issues and non-proven theories, I had to stop for a bit and being a New Yorker say, "Lucy. He went out with Lucy. That's what happened. You know that hominid"
However on page 380 I found a problem that many men disregard -quote- "...the women tend to accumulate much fat in their buttocks (termed steatopygia)..." Let me laugh at this! Who has been to a chiropractor, and not know that the male driven hard sexual drive may ruin a woman's back -so bad- that the nerves to the buttocks are useless -in the sense of letting the cells know they might be exercising? Reminds me of what that Italian Berlusconi insulting Merkel didn't know, she probably had great, rough sex and has a damaged back, which makes her but fat!
I am having a great good old time reading through all this material and the wonderful, refreshing relevance of conveyed thoughts put together to derive and answer to Yali's question. Great Read!
 

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AWFUL

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good:)

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Ever wonder why it was the Europeans who conquered the world and not the Native Americans or the Africans? In the past, this question was typically answered with a racially charged assumption about the supremacy of certain races and peoples. Evolutionary biologist Jared Diamond tears these assumptions apart by offering a host of environmental factors to explain the course of human history. Guns, Germs, and Steel is a worthy winner of the Pulitzer Prize and a must read for anyone who is curious about the course of human history. 

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Really good. A must read.

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Categorizing humans always is of interest for those that use labels. The categories that are suggested in this book are of a biological nature. A shallow approach.

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This is a very good book

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