Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine, Volume 61 (Google eBook)

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W. Blackwood, 1847
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Page 408 - That it was our duty, if ever the Lord brought us back again in peace, to call Charles Stuart, that man of blood, to an account for that blood he had shed, and mischief he had done to his utmost, against the Lord's Cause and People in these poor Nations.
Page 640 - Light down, light down, now, true Thomas, And lean your head upon my knee, Abide and rest a little space, And I will show you ferlies three.
Page 128 - License they mean when they cry Liberty ; For who loves that must first be wise and good : But from that mark how far they rove we see, For all this waste of wealth and loss of blood.
Page 644 - LIMITS OF ACT. IV. This Act shall extend to all places within the limits of the metropolis as defined by an Act passed in the present Session of Parliament, intituled An Act for the...
Page 629 - Their van will be upon us Before the bridge goes down; And if they once may win the bridge, What hope to save the town? ' Then out spake brave Horatius, The Captain of the gate : 'To every man upon this earth Death cometh soon or late; And how can man die better Than facing fearful odds, For the ashes of his fathers And the temples of his Gods...
Page 414 - I will put an end to your prating," and steps forth into the floor of the House, and " clapping on his hat," and occasionally " stamping the floor with his feet," begins a discourse which no man can report ! He says Heavens!
Page 400 - for our part,' could wish blindness have not been upon your eyes to all those marvellous dispensations which God hath lately wrought in England. But did not you solemnly appeal and pray ? Did not we do so too '{ And ought not you and we to think, with fear and trembling, of the hand of the Great God in this mighty and strange appearance of His; instead of slightly calling it an
Page 334 - They were stoned, they were sawn asunder, were tempted, were slain with the sword. They wandered about in sheepskins and goatskins; being destitute, afflicted, tormented; of whom the world was not worthy. They wandered in deserts, and in mountains, and in dens and caves of the earth.
Page 414 - You have sat too long here for any good you have been doing. Depart, I say, and let us have done with you. In the name of God, go!
Page 129 - Fame is the spur that the clear spirit doth raise (That last infirmity of noble mind) To scorn delights and live laborious days; But the fair guerdon when we hope to find, And think to burst out into sudden blaze, Comes the blind Fury with th' abhorred shears, And slits the thin-spun life. 'But not the praise...

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