The Beauty Myth: How Images of Beauty Are Used Against Women

Front Cover
HarperCollins, 2002 - Social Science - 368 pages
260 Reviews
The bestselling classic that redefined our view od the relationship between beauty and female identity.

In today's world, women have more power, legal recognition, and professional success than ever before. Alongside the evident progress of the women's movement, however, writer and journalist Naomi Wolf is troubled by a different kind of social control, which, she argues, may prove just as restrictive as the traditional image of homemaker and wife. It's the beauty myth, an obsession with physical perfection that traps the modern woman in an endless spiral of hope, self-consciousness, and self-hatred as she tries to fulfill society's impossible definition of "the flawless beauty."

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This book is interesting and Wolf is a good writer. - Goodreads
This was incredibly hard to read. - Goodreads
Have never really researched on the feminist ideals. - Goodreads
This is feminism 101 or introduction to. - Goodreads

Review: The Beauty Myth: How Images of Beauty are Used Against Women

User Review  - Jessica - Goodreads

Let me start off by saying I completely agree with her thesis: beauty myths are pervasive and seriously damaging and sapping to women. And men. The book was so vitriolic and full of extrapolation that ... Read full review

Review: The Beauty Myth: How Images of Beauty are Used Against Women

User Review  - Cat Tobin - Goodreads

I thought that some of the ideas in this (like the lack of a variety of women's media to give multiple female viewpoints) were insightful, it's clear from the emotive language she uses that this is a ... Read full review

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About the author (2002)

Naomi Wolf is the author of Promiscuitties and Fire With Fire, and her essays have appeared in The New Republic, Esquire, Ms., The Washington Post, and The New York Times. She holds a degree from Yale University and New College, Oxford University, and lives in New York City.

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