Zoologist: A Monthly Journal of Natural History (Google eBook)

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1847 - Zoology
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Page 1647 - Forthwith the sounds and seas, each creek and bay, With fry innumerable swarm, and shoals Of fish, that with their fins and shining scales Glide under the green wave, in sculls that oft Bank the mid sea...
Page 1630 - The circumference of the circle was formed by upright posts of black oak, measuring from 6 to 8 feet in height ; these were mortised into beams of a similar material, laid flat upon the marl and sand beneath the bog, and nearly 16 feet below the present surface. The upright posts were held together by connecting cross-beams, and [said to be] fastened by large iron nails ; parts of a second upper tier of posts were likewise found resting on the lower ones.
Page 1772 - Few animals have obtained so universal a celebrity as the condor. That bird was known in Europe, at a period when his native land was numbered among those fabulous regions which are regarded as the scenes of imaginary wonders. The most extravagant accounts of the condor were written and read, and general credence was granted to every story which travellers brought from the fairy land of gold and silver. It was only at the commencement of the present century that Humboldt overthrew the extravagant...
Page 1904 - The run is differently formed in spring, in consequence of a difference of object. Where fields are not large, the hedge is still the selected spot ; on which account its nest is not often discovered. Mr. Bell has given a sketch of the skilful arrangements made for its safety at this time ; but in districts where the hedge is chosen for defence, no other departure from its usual form is made than an enlargement of the space, and a more comfortable lining. Fourteen young ones have been discovered...
Page 1772 - The full-grown condor measures, from the point of the beak to the end of the tail, from four feet ten inches to five feet ; and from the tip of one wing to the other, from twelve to thirteen feet.
Page 1812 - I had not to wait long ; a loud whirr, and there she was, suspended in the air before her nest. She soon espied me, and came within a foot of my eyes, hovering just in front of my face. I remained still, however, when I heard the whirring of another just above me, perhaps the mate, but I durst not look towards him, lest the turning of my head should frighten the female. In a minute or two the other was gone, and she alighted again...
Page 1773 - A curious method of capturing the condor alive is practised in the province of Abancay. A fresh cow-hide, with some fragments of flesh adhering to it, is spread out on one of the level heights, and an Indian provided with ropes creeps beneath it, whilst some others station themselves in ambush near the spot ready to assist him. Presently a condor, attracted by the smell of the flesh, darts down upon the cow-hide, and then the Indian, who is concealed under it, seizes the bird by the legs, and binds...
Page 1832 - ... its close and uniform adaptation. In moulding soft objects it is, of course, necessary that they should possess elasticity or resiliency, as is the case with living or recently dead animal bodies. The gutta percha does not seem to be applicable to taking moulds from very fragile- bodies, such as many fossils, which would not bear the requisite pressure nor admit of the removal of the mould when rigid without risk. The most delicate objects, however, and slender projections, if firm enough...
Page 1812 - Polytmus hovering opposite the nest with a mass of silk cotton in her beak. Deterred by the sight of me, she presently retired to a twig a few paces distant, on which she sat. I immediately sank down among the rocks, as quietly as possible, and remained perfectly still.
Page 1714 - We had run about half the distance, as we supposed, and were enjoying ourselves on deck smoking our cigars, and getting our tackle ready for the approaching campaign against the salmon, when we were surprised by the sight of an immense shoal of grampuses, which appeared in an unusual state of excitement, and which, in their gambols, approached so close to our little craft that some of the party amused themselves by firing at them with rifles ; at this time we were jogging on at about five miles an...

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