Raphael: His Life and Works: With Particular Reference to Recently Discovered Records, and an Exhaustive Study of Extant Drawings and Pictures, Volume 1 (Google eBook)

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J. Murray, 1882 - Painters
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Page 388 - Works are intended to furnish a complete account of the leading personages, the Institutions, Art, Social Life, Writings, and Controversies of the Christian Church from the time of the Apostles to the Age of Charlemagne. They commence at the period at which the ' ' Dictionary of the Bible " leaves off, and form a continuation of it.
Page 392 - CESNOLA'S CYPRUS. Cyprus: its Ancient Cities, Tombs, and Temples. A Narrative of Researches and Excavations during Ten Years
Page 388 - A HISTORY OF GREEK SCULPTURE. From the EARLIEST TIMES down to the AGE OF PHEIDIAS. By AS MURRAY, of the British Museum.
Page 386 - Version, AD 1611, with an EXPLANATORY and CRITICAL COMMENTARY, and a REVISION of the TRANSLATION. By BISHOPS and CLERGY of the ANGLICAN CHURCH. Edited by FC COOK, MA, Canon of Exeter, Preacher at Lincoln's Inn, and Chaplain in Ordinary to the Queen.
Page 388 - A Dictionary of Christian Biography, Literature, Sects, and Doctrines. From the Time of the Apostles to the Age of Charlemagne.
Page 386 - HISTORY OF EGYPT UNDER THE PHARAOHS. DERIVED ENTIRELY FROM THE MONUMENTS. WITH A MEMOIR ON THE EXODUS OF THE ISRAELITES AND THE EGYPTIAN MONUMENTS. By Dr. HENRY BRUGSCH BEY.
Page 201 - A lovely girl stands near his head with a sword in one hand and a book in the other...
Page 390 - Gennesareth, &c. A Canoe Cruise in Palestine and Egypt, and the Waters of Damascus.
Page 389 - A DICTIONARY OF GREEK AND ROMAN GEOGRAPHY. Including- the Political History of both Countries and Cities, as well as their Geography. (2500 pp. ) With 530 Illustrations, a vols. Medium Svo, s&r. FOR SCHOOLS AND COLLEGES. A CLASSICAL DICTIONARY OF BIOGRAPHY, MYTHOLOGY,
Page 399 - Oxford,' and which are too often forgotten even by our best draughtsmen. I call Mr. George's work precious, chiefly because it indicates an intense perception of points of character in architecture, and a sincere enjoyment of them for their own sake. His drawings are not accumulative of material for future use ; still less are they vain exhibitions of his own skill. He draws the scene in all its true relations, because it delights him, and he perceives what is permanently and altogether characteristic...

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