A Study of Omaha Indian Music, Volume 1, Issues 1-7 (Google eBook)

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Peabody museum of American archaeology and ethnology, 1904 - Omaha Indians - 152 pages
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Page 23 - In order to remove all possibility of misunderstanding as to the true significance of the word "rods" let us go back to the original Spanish text of the "Memoria de la joyas, etc., remitadas al emperador Carlos V, por Don Fernando Cortds, etc., en 1519," as published in the Coleccion de documentos ineditos para la Historia de Espana, Navarrete, Madrid, 1842, vol.
Page 184 - Chinese cainphor-wood boxes. The outlines of the figures strikingly resemble those of the drawings in the Vienna Codex. Two standing and four seated human figures are carved on the back of this atlatl. On the front, on both sides of the groove, besides human figures, I counted one representation of a serpent and no less than five finely carved serpents' heads. (It is an interesting fact and one to which I will revert, that the serpent symbol is carved on each of the three specimens I have mentioned.)...
Page 189 - It is still more interesting, however, to ascertain through authentic records that atlatl, made in the shape of a serpent and inlaid with turquoises, were in real ceremonial use at the time of the Conquest.
Page 198 - MSS. dating from the time of the Conquest one can trace the disappearance of the atlatl by its increasingly incorrect representations and note its extinction by finding these finally superseded by pictures of the bow and arrow. And thus the interrupted evolution of the truly wonderful atlatl, the spear-thrower of ancient Mexico, came to an end. The atlatl, although exquisitely carved, covered with gold, inlaid with turquoise, decorated with feather work and exhibiting the remarkable degree of skill...
Page 81 - The task of erecting the tents by laboriously boring the willow poles into the earth at either end, carefully pointed, crossing at the top, and covering the windward side with undressed skins, the bringing of water and wood and other menial tasks, were always performed by the women. The fire was in the middle of the tent, upon a few stones, and the fish or venison was cooked and eaten, not with salt but with chile, fingers taking the place of forks. The men were very tall, magnificently formed, with...
Page 82 - ... concealed ; his long, black hair streamed over his back, and he bent nearly double as he moved about, seldom raising himself to an erect posture. The chant rose and fell in a melancholy sort of cadence, and occasionally all the Indians joined in the chorus which was Ha'-i-yah, Ha'-i-yah ; har, hai'yah, hai'yah, hai'-yah. The first two words were shouted slowly, then a loud hai', then a succession of hai'-yahs very rapidly uttered in chromatic ascending and descending tones, ending in an abrupt...
Page 114 - The Carancahuases, Indians from Texas, were mentioned at Reynosa by some witnesses who in 1872 testified that this tribe had been driven into Mexico by American troops since 1848, and had obtained an asylum. In 1688 this tribe lived on the bay of Espiritu Santo, where it was found by the governor of Coahuila, Don Alonso de Leon, when, by order of the Viceroy of Mexico, he marched with troops to that point to drive away the French, who had gained a footing there. It was found that, these Frenchmen...
Page 71 - Wawan ceremony is profoundly religious, its symbols are treated with as great reverence as any priest treats the crucifix or the Sacred Host; all phases of religious emotion are embodied in its songs. He who knows, feels and appreciates this, who penetrates so far into the Indian feeling as to be partly oblivious of non-essential accessories, can begin to appreciate the feeling Miss Fletcher expressed to me when she told me that she had never been so powerfully impressed or so profoundly stirred...
Page 183 - ... tassel-like appendages or long streamers. We observe that the atlatl itself is generally painted blue while the decoration is of many colors. Having learned all these interesting details from the old manuscripts, let us leave them for a moment and study the three existing specimens of Ancient Mexican atlatl which have come under my notice. The finest of these is in the Museo Kircheriana in Rome where I had the privilege of examining it closely in May, 1890. The British Museum specimen ranks next...
Page 216 - Since then Mr. Gatschet has been able to examine a much larger and more satisfactory body of material, and although neither in amount nor quality is the material sufficient to permit final and satisfactory deductions, yet so far as it goes it shows that the language is quite distinct from any of the Algonquian dialects, and in fact from any other American tongue.

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