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Books Books 1 - 10 of 17 on For what do we live, but to make sport for our neighbours, and laugh at them in our....  
" For what do we live, but to make sport for our neighbours, and laugh at them in our turn ? " " Oh," cried Elizabeth,  "
Pride and Prejudice - Page 318
by Jane Austen - 1853 - 340 pages
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The Novels of Jane Austen: Pride and prejudice

Jane Austen - 1892
...young olive-branch. But, Lizzy, you look as if you did not enjoy it. You are not going to be mitsith, I hope, and pretend to be affronted at an idle report....on any other man, it would have been nothing ; but bit perfect indifference, and your pointed dislike, make it so delightfully absurd ! Much as I abominate...
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The Novels of Jane Austen: Pride and prejudice

Jane Austen - English fiction - 1892
...young olive-branch. But, Lizzy, you look as if you did not enjoy it. You are not going to be missish, I hope, and pretend to be affronted at an idle report...." I am excessively diverted. But it is so strange! " " Yes—that is what makes it amusing. Had they fixed on any other man, it would have been nothing...
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The novels of Jane Austen, Volume 4

Jane Austen - 1905
...young olive-branch. But, Lizzy, you look as if you did not enjoy it. You are not going to be missish, I hope, and pretend to be affronted at an idle report....been nothing; but his perfect indifference, and your 258 pointed dislike, make it so delightfully absurd ! Much as I abominate writing, I would not give...
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The novels and letters of Jane Austen, Volume 4

Jane Austen - 1906
...young olive-branch. But, Lizzy, you look as if you did not enjoy it. You are not going to be rnissisli, I hope, and pretend to be affronted at an idle report....on any other man, it would have been nothing; but Ms perfect indifference, and your pointed dislike, make it so delightfully absurd! Much as I abominate...
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Pride and Prejudice ; Mansfield Park ; and Northanger Abbey

Jane Austen - 1906 - 993 pages
...young olive-branch; But, Lizzy, you look as if you did not enjoy it; You are not going to be missish, I hope, and pretend to be affronted at an idle report....them in our turn ? " " Oh," cried Elizabeth, " I am exceedingly diverted. But it is so strange ! " " Yes, that is what makes ft amusing. Had they fixed...
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The novels of Jane Austen, Volume 4

Jane Austen - 1906
...young olive-branch. But, Lizzy, you look as if you did not enjoy it. You are not going to be missish, I hope, and pretend to be affronted at an idle report....neighbours, and laugh at them in our turn ? ' ' Oh 1 ' cried Elizabeth, ' I am excessively diverted. But it is so strange ! ' ' Yes ; that is what makes...
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Jane Austen

...Bennet has occasion to complain. But for all his wit, Mr Bennet's view of life is empty and cynical: 'For what do we live, but to make sport for our neighbours, and laugh at them in our turn? ' He can contribute nothing to Elizabeth's moral education beyond the example of an experience to be...
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The Proper Lady and the Woman Writer: Ideology as Style in the Works of Mary ...

Mary Poovey - Literary Criticism - 1985 - 287 pages
...irresponsibility by describing social relations as an amusing game. "For what do we live," he asks rhetorically, "but to make sport for our neighbours, and laugh at them in our turn?" (p. 364). But the pain that unthinking Lydia visits on the rest of the family proves conclusively how...
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On Moral Personhood: Philosophy, Literature, Criticism, and Self-Understanding

Richard Thomas Eldridge - Literary Criticism - 1989 - 210 pages
...It is thus no surprise that he should rhetorically, and no more than half ironically, ask Elizabeth, "For what do we live, but to make sport for our neighbours, and laugh at them in our turn?" (251). The amusing, and only the amusing, is what he has come to care about. His initial seriousness,...
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The Concise Columbia Dictionary of Quotations

Robert Andrews - Reference - 1989 - 343 pages
...(1593-1633) English clergyman, poet Good fences make good neighbors. Robert Frost (1874-1963) American poet For what do we live, but to make sport for our neighbours, and laugh at them in our turn? Jane Austen (1775-1817) English novelist See Shaw on PREACHING Neurosis Oh the nerves, the nerves;...
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