R.U.R.

Front Cover
Courier Corporation, Aug 20, 2001 - Drama - 64 pages
8 Reviews
Great play, that introduced the word "robot" into English, looks to a future in which all workers are automatons. Their revolt when they acquire souls (i.e., when they gain the ability to hate) and the resulting catastrophe make for a powerful and deeply moving theatrical experience. "It is murderous social satire, done in terms of the most hair-raising melodrama." — Alexander Woolcott. "As awe-inspiring as anything we have ever seen in the theatre." — Heywood Broun. Paul Selver translation.
  

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Not quite what I expected

User Review  - eruann - Overstock.com

For all the hype surrounding this book as the first use of the word "robot", it has precious little to do with what we in the current day would identify as robots. For starters, this is actually a ... Read full review

Review: RUR

User Review  - Kathryn - Goodreads

If you have ever liked science fiction, this play was really the start of it all. Capek invented the word "robot." I feel like half of all science fiction I have read or seen rips off this book ... Read full review

Selected pages

Contents

ACT I
1
ACT II
19
ACT III
37
EPILOGUE
51
Copyright

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About the author (2001)

Karel Capek is best known abroad for his plays, but at home he is also revered as an accomplished novelist, short-story writer, essayist, and writer of political articles. His bitingly satirical novel The War with the Newts (1936) reveals his understanding of the possible consequences of scientific advance. The novel Krakatit (1924), about an explosive that could destroy the world, foreshadows the feared potential of a nuclear disaster. In his numerous short stories he depicts the problems of modern life and common people in a humorous and whimsically philosophical fashion. The plays of Karel Capek presage the Theater of the Absurd. R.U.R. (Rossum's Universal Robots) (1921) was a satire on the machine age. He created the word robot from the Czech noun robota, meaning "work" for the human-made automatons who in that play took over the world, leaving only one human being alive. The Insect Comedy (1921), whose characters are insects, is an ironic fantasy on human weakness. The Makropoulos Secret (1923), later used as the basis for Leos Janacek's opera, was an experimental piece that questioned whether immortality is really desirable. All the plays have been produced successfully in New York. Most deal satirically with the modern machine age or with war. Underlying all his work, though, is a faith in humanity, truth, justice, and democracy, which has made him one of the most beloved of all Czech writers.

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