Pythagoras' Revenge: A Mathematical Mystery

Front Cover
Princeton University Press, May 10, 2009 - Fiction - 183 pages
22 Reviews

The celebrated mathematician and philosopher Pythagoras left no writings. But what if he had and the manuscript was never found? Where would it be located? And what information would it reveal? These questions are the inspiration for the mathematical mystery novel Pythagoras' Revenge. Suspenseful and instructive, Pythagoras' Revenge weaves fact, fiction, mathematics, computer science, and ancient history into a surprising and sophisticated thriller.

The intrigue begins when Jule Davidson, a young American mathematician who trolls the internet for difficult math riddles and stumbles upon a neo-Pythagorean sect searching for the promised reincarnation of Pythagoras. Across the ocean, Elmer Galway, a professor of classical history at Oxford, discovers an Arabic manuscript hinting at the existence of an ancient scroll--possibly left by Pythagoras himself. Unknown to one another, Jule and Elmer each have information that the other requires and, as they race to solve the philosophical and mathematical puzzles set before them, their paths ultimately collide. Set in 1998 with flashbacks to classical Greece, Pythagoras' Revenge investigates the confrontation between opposing views of mathematics and reality, and explores ideas from both early and cutting-edge mathematics.

From academic Oxford to suburban Chicago and historic Rome, Pythagoras' Revenge is a sophisticated thriller that will grip readers from beginning to surprising end.

  

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Review: Pythagoras' Revenge: A Mathematical Mystery

User Review  - Arty - Goodreads

The maths was fun and the history interesting but I was disappointed in the book. Sorry. Read full review

Review: Pythagoras' Revenge: A Mathematical Mystery

User Review  - Goodreads

The maths was fun and the history interesting but I was disappointed in the book. Sorry. Read full review

Contents

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About the author (2009)

Arturo Sangalli is a freelance science journalist and writer. He has a PhD in mathematics from the University of Montreal. He is the author of "The Importance of Being Fuzzy: And Other Insights from the Border between Math and Computers" (Princeton) and has contributed many pieces to "New Scientist".

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