Satires, Epistles and Ars poetica, Volume 1929

Front Cover
Harvard University Press, 1978 - Literary Criticism - 508 pages
2 Reviews

Horace (Quintus Horatius Flaccus, 658 BCE) was born at Venusia, son of a freedman clerk who had him well educated at Rome and Athens. Horace supported the ill-fated killers of Caesar, lost his property, became a secretary in the Treasury, and began to write poetry. Maecenas, lover of literature, to whom Virgil and Varius introduced Horace in 39, became his friend and made him largely independent by giving him a farm. After 30 Horace knew and aided with his pen the emperor Augustus, who after Virgil's death in 19 engaged him to celebrate imperial affairs in poetry. Horace refused to become Augustus's private secretary and died a few months after Maecenas. Both lyric (in various metres) and other work (in hexameters) was spread over the period 4010 or 9 BCE. It is Roman in spirit, Greek in technique.

In the two books of Satires Horace is a moderate social critic and commentator; the two books of Epistles are more intimate and polished, the second book being literary criticism as is also the Ars Poetica. The Epodes in various (mostly iambic) metres are akin to the 'discourses' (as Horace called his satires and epistles) but also look towards the famous Odes, in four books, in the old Greek lyric metres used with much skill. Some are national odes about public affairs; some are pleasant poems of love and wine; some are moral letters; all have a rare perfection. The Loeb Classical Library edition of the Odes and Epodes is in volume number 33.

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Review: Satires, Epistles and Ars Poetica (Loeb Classical Library No. 194)

User Review  - Birgitta Hoffmann - Goodreads

Horace has often been described as untranslateable, which is too often true, there are only so many ways you can render a dense weave or allusions, wordplay and metaphors - something will give ... Read full review

Review: Satires, Epistles and Ars Poetica (Loeb Classical Library No. 194)

User Review  - Sarah - Goodreads

Struggling to understand how the oldies look at art, I found this little snack more of a crumb than tasty morsel. Art that is art, poetry that is poetry, music that is music... The circular language leaves me dizzy, but I am interested in the confusion that results. Read full review

Contents

Satire 1
124
Satire V
196
248391
248
Copyright

6 other sections not shown

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About the author (1978)

Editor of Virgil: The Aeneid (Pengiun Classics, 1991), and author of Reading Horace (Edinburgh UP, 1967), The Imagery and Poetry of Lucretius (Edinburgh UP, 1969, reprint Bristol CP, 1994)