The Texts of Taoism, Volume 1

Front Cover
Courier Dover Publications, 1962 - Philosophy - 418 pages
1 Review
Volume 1 of sacred writings of mystical Chinese religion reveal Tao, the way—the key to living an obstacle-free life. Based on wu-wei, taking no unnatural action, it would make individual existence like the flow of water with no obstacles to impede. Famed Sinologist here offers standard English version of major Taoist writings: the Tao Te Ching of Lao Tse, the writings of Chuang Tse, and several shorter works. Mostly unavailable elsewhere in English.
  

What people are saying - Write a review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - brown8775 - LibraryThing

This translation is very early, which I assume to be the reason for the clumsiness of the translation. However, it is quite interesting to read a late 19th century Western mind's grappling with ... Read full review

Contents

cHAT
1
WHAT is THE MEANING OF THE NAME TAO? AND
12
AccOUNTS OF LAojzE AND ATWANGJZE GIvEN
33
THE WRITINGS OF AVANG3ZE
127
PART I
142
other Men
203
Master
236
Kings
259
PART II
268
Transliteration of Oriental Alphabets adopted for the Transla
393
Kemusat and I am content in my interpretation of it to abide by the aids
400
IN the Preface to the third volume of these Sacred
1
fulfilment of the promise made so long ago They contain
10
Copyright

References to this book

All Book Search results »

About the author (1962)

Mencius, also known by his birth name Meng Ke or Ko, was born in the State of Zou, now forming the territory of the county-level city of Zoucheng (originally Zouxian), Shandong province, only thirty kilometres (eighteen miles) south of Qufu, Confucius' birthplace. He was an itinerant Chinese philosopher and sage, and one of the principal interpreters of Confucianism. Supposedly, he was a pupil of Confucius' grandson, Zisi. Like Confucius, according to legend, he travelled China for forty years to offer advice to rulers for reform. During the Warring States period (403-221 BC), Mencius served as an official and scholar at the Jixia Academy in the State of Qi (1046 BC to 221 BC) from 319 to 312 BC. He expressed his filial devotion when he took an absence of three years from his official duties for Qi to mourn his mother's death. Disappointed at his failure to effect changes in his contemporary world, he retired from public life. Mencius is buried in the "Mencius Cemetery," which is located 12 km to the northeast of Zoucheng's central urban area. A stele carried by a giant stone tortoise and crowned with dragons stands in front of his grave.

Bibliographic information