Hawthorne in Concord

Front Cover
Grove Press, 2005 - Biography & Autobiography - 341 pages
3 Reviews
Acclaimed historian Philip McFarland illuminates three distinct periods when Nathaniel Hawthorne lived in the bucolic village of Concord, Massachusetts. On his wedding day in 1842, the author escorts his new wife, Sophia, to their first home, the Old Manse. There, enriched by friendships with Thoreau and Emerson, he enjoys an idyllic time. But three years later, unable to make enough money from his writing, he returns ingloriously, with his wife and infant daughter, to live in his mother's home in Salem. In 1853 Hawthorne moves back to Concord, now the renowned author of "The Scarlet Letter and "The House of the Seven Gables. Eager to resume writing fiction at the seene of his earlier happiness, he assembles a biography of his college friend Franklin Pierce, who is running for president. When Pierce wins the election. Hawthorne is appointed the lucrative post of consul in Liverpool. Coming home from Europe in 1860, as America hovers on the verge of civil war, Hawthorne settles down in Concord once more, a town brimming with abolitionist sentiment. He tries to take up writing one last time, but deteriorating health finds him withdrawing into private life. In "Hawthorne in Concord McFarland "paints a selective, complex, and ultimately enriching portrait of America's earliest psychological novelist in his middle years" ("Kirkus Reviews, starred review).
  

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - Midnightdreary - LibraryThing

What makes this book stand out among a sea of Hawthorne biographies is McFarland's impressive ability to put Hawthorne in context. Though the title is "Hawthorne in Concord," the book takes us through ... Read full review

Hawthorne in Concord

User Review  - Not Available - Book Verdict

This year, as literary enthusiasts celebrate the bicentennial of Nathaniel Hawthorne's birth, historian McFarland (The Brave Bostonians) regales readers with this timely account of the author's ... Read full review

Contents

WEDDING IN BOSTON
3
THE MANSE AND HISTORIC CONCORD
9
AN END TO SOLITUDE
17
CONCORD IN THE FORTIES
26
VISITORS AT THE MANSE
33
MARGARET FULLER AND HENRY THOREAU
40
HAWTHORNE AND EMERSON TOGETHER
47
FIRST FALL AT THE MANSE
54
CREATING A LIFE
173
DAYS AT THE WAYSIDE
180
TO WASHINGTON
188
DEPARTURE FOR EUROPE
196
ONCE MORE TO CONCORD
205
ALTERING THE WAYSIDE
213
CONCORD IN THE SIXTIES
221
SECESSION
229

HAWTHORNES WRITING
62
TWO MORE WEDDINGS
69
RURAL UTOPIAS
78
SEEKING A LIVELIHOOD
86
UNA
94
WOMEN IN THE NINETEENTH CENTURY
101
THE NATION BEYOND CONCORD
109
LEAVING THE OLD MANSE
117
THE WAYSIDE
127
RETURN TO CONCORD
132
CONCORD IN THE FIFTIES
140
TWO NOVELS
148
HAWTHORNE AND SLAVERY
157
DEATH BY WATER
164
PATRIOTIC AMERICANS
237
IN THE SKY PARLOR
246
TOURING WITH TICKNOR
254
WAR MATTERS
263
FAMILY MATTERS
272
OUR OLD HOME
279
LAST TRAVELS
286
RELEASE
293
NOTES
303
Works Cited
325
Acknowledgments
331
INDEX
333
Copyright

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About the author (2005)

Philip McFarland was educated at Oberlin College and Cambridge University. He is the author of four books of nonfiction, including Hawthorne in Concord. He lives in Massachusetts.

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