Encyclopędia britannica: or, A dictionary of arts, sciences, and miscellaneous literature, Volume 17, Part 1 (Google eBook)

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Colin Macfarquhar, George Gleig
A. Bell and C. Macfarquhar, 1797 - Reference
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Page 132 - God came from Teman, and the Holy One from mount Paran. His glory covered the heavens, and the earth was full of his praise, and his brightness was as the light. He had horns coming out of his hand: and there was the hiding of his power.
Page 278 - O my soul's joy ! If after every tempest come such calms, May the winds blow till they have waken'd death ! And let the labouring bark climb hills of seas, Olympus-high ; and duck again as low As hell's from heaven ! If it were now to die, 'Twere now to be most happy ; for, I fear, My soul hath her content so absolute, That not another comfort like to this Succeeds in unknown fate.
Page 281 - Poets lays, Due to his merit, and brave thirst of praise Living, great Nature fear'd he might outvie Her works ; and dying, fears herself may die.
Page 133 - For from the rising of the sun even unto the going down of the same my name shall be great among the Gentiles; and in every place incense shall be offered unto my name, and a pure offering: for my name shall be great among the heathen, saith the Lord of hosts.
Page 249 - Now this was the manner in former time in Israel concerning redeeming, and concerning changing, for to confirm all things ; a man plucked off his shoe, and gave it to his neighbour : and this was a testimony in Israel.
Page 110 - And it came to pass, when Moses had made an end of writing the words of this law in a book, until they were finished, that Moses commanded the Levites, which bare the ark of the covenant of the Lord, saying, Take this book of the law, and put it in the side of the ark of the covenant of the Lord your God, that it may be there for a witness against thee.
Page 333 - But love is only one of many passions, and as it has no great influence upon the sum of life, it has little operation in the dramas of a poet, who caught his ideas from the living world, and exhibited only what he saw before him. He knew, that any other passion, as it was regular or exorbitant, was a cause of happiness or calamity.
Page 313 - If the hiring be general without any particular time limited, the law construes it to be a hiring for a year; upon a principle of natural equity, that the servant shall serve, and the master maintain him, throughout all the revolutions of the respective seasons; as well when there is work to be done, as when there is not...
Page 248 - Sejanus, elated with joy, and fluflied with his new dignity, entered the fenate-houfe ; Macro followed him. As foon as the confuķs arrived, he delivered the letter from Tiberius, and immediately went forth to the praetorian guards. He informed them, that by order of the prince, a large donative was to be dillributed among the foldiers.
Page 235 - ... diminution of the waters is apt to raise in a lonely region, full of echoes, and rocks, and caverns ; the grotesque and ghastly appearance of such a landscape by the light of the moon. Objects like these diffuse a gloom over the fancy, which may be compatible enough with occasional and social merriment, but cannot fail to tincture the thoughts of a native in the hour of silence and solitude.

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