Elements of Chemistry: Including the Most Recent Discoveries and Applications of the Science to Medicine and Pharmacy, and to the Arts. Illustrated by 236 Wood-cuts (Google eBook)

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Hodges and Smith, 1842 - Chemistry - 1204 pages
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Page iii - OF CHEMISTRY ; Including the most Recent Discoveries and Applications of the Science to Medicine and Pharmacy, and to the Arts. By ROBERT KANE, MDMRIA, Professor of Natural Philosophy to the Royal Dublin Society.
Page 585 - Celeste, — the respect due to whose opinion no one will dispute, — maintained that these meteoric stones are expelled violently from the active volcanoes which telescopic research has proved to exist in great numbers on the surface of the moon, and that, passing beyond the limits of the attraction of our satellite, they come within the influence of the earth and are drawn towards its surface.
Page 1067 - It is insoluble in water, but dissolves readily in alcohol and ether; and in much greater quantity in these liquids when hot, than when cold.
Page 322 - ... like it, of two glass cylinders, one within the other, the smaller one having a bottom or floor of plaster of Paris fixed into it : this smaller tube may be about half an inch wide and three inches in length, and is intended to hold the metallic solution submitted to experiment, the external tube in which it is immersed being filled with a weak solution of common salt *. Into the latter solution a slip of amalgamated zinc, (for the positive electrode,) soldered to the wire coming from the copper...
Page 383 - It is remarkable," says !Łane, " that this law of catalysis, of which the simplest expression is, that where two chemical substances are in contact, any motion occurring among the particles of the one may be communicated to the particles of the other, is of a more purely mechanical nature than any other principle as yet received in chemistry ; and when more definitely established by succeeding research, it may be the basis of a dynamical theory in chemistry, as the law of equivalents and of multiple...
Page 999 - The citric acid possesses an agreeably sour taste ; it dissolves in less than its own weight of cold, and in half its weight of boiling water...
Page 579 - ... 159 : 25 : : m to the quantity required. (b.) The chlorine evolved is passed through water in which lime is diffused ; chloride of lime is formed ; a certain quantity of protosulphate of iron is dissolved in water, and the solution of chloride of lime is added thereto, until the iron liquor ceases to strike a blue colour with a drop of solution of red prussiate of...
Page 507 - The retort has a large opening, to which a capital, b, c, resembling the head of an alembic, is adapted, and luted with pipeclay. In the capital itself there are two openings, a larger and a smaller, at b and c, closed by leaden stoppers. A series of bottles d, having each two openings, connected together, as represented in the figure, and with their joinings luted, are used as condensers. The prepared ley being heated to about 140° in the retort, the manganese is then introduced, and bc luted to...
Page 448 - ... distribution of nitric acid in nature which is exceedingly remarkable, and which forces itself upon the attention of every student of the process of nitrification. Although nitric acid is generally so scantily present in the soil, there is one notable exception to this rule, for in the rainless districts of Chili and Peru there are found immense deposits of nitrate of soda, or...
Page 267 - ... action, probably sometimes, in direct opposition to affinity, serving, on the principles of Berthollet, to explain the anomalous discordance between those experiments on which the tables of affinities of bodies for each other had been constructed. To set this matter in a clear point of view, suppose a quantity of sulphate of soda and nitrate of potash to be dissolved in water, each acid is attracted at the same moment by both bases, and each base by both acids ; so that there occurs a division...

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