Portsmouth, historic and picturesque: a volume of information (Google eBook)

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C. S. Gurney, 1902 - Portsmouth (N.H.) - 225 pages
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Page 79 - Tobago rum, which will be sold for the most they will bring. They are at the service of the State. If we succeed in defending our firesides and our homes, I may be remunerated ; if we do not, then the property will be of no value to me. Our friend Stark, who so nobly maintained the honor of our State at Bunker Hill, may safely be entrusted with the honor of the enterprise, and we will check the progress of Burgoyne.
Page 97 - It was a pleasant mansion, an abode Near and yet hidden from the great high-road, Sequestered among trees, a noble pile, Baronial and colonial in its style...
Page 22 - We, the subscribers, do hereby solemnly engage and promise that we will, to the utmost of our power, at the risque of our lives and fortunes, with arms oppose the hostile proceedings of the British fleets and armies against the United American Colonies.
Page 137 - ... Lord's day out of the meeting in the time of the publique exercise.". The press of other matters delayed the carrying out of this order for nine years. In 1671, the Selectmen made a contract with Capt. John Pickering (who appears to be a carpenter as well as miller, lawyer and commander of a company), to build a cage twelve feet square and seven feet high. The studs to be six inches broad, four inches thick, and the openings between them to be three inches. " The studs are to be round the said...
Page 9 - John Mason and seven other associates.* This province was named Laconia, by reason ''of the great Lakes therein." The design of the Laconia adventurers was to seize upon and engross to their own profit the rich peltry traffic of that vast region, then in the hands of the French and the Dutch. It was believed, in the absence of accurate knowledge of the interior country, that Lake Champlain (then called the Iroquois) could be reached from the New England coast by a journey of about 90 miles, and that...
Page 57 - April 4, 1709), я citizen of abundant wealth, prominent station and influence in the Province of New Hampshire, who married (Oct. 2, 1740) Miss Sarah, daughter of Daniel and Sarah (Hill) Warner, of Portsmouth. He graduated at Harvard College in 1728, was Clerk of the Courts of the Province from 1729 to 1739, and from 1745 for twenty-one years representative from Portsmouth to the Provincial Assembly, of which he was Speaker the last ten years. He was delegate to the Colonial Congress at Albany in...
Page 6 - Walter Neale was a true soldier of fortune ; always ready for an expedition or campaign ; always seeking that kind of employment from the English court or any transient patron among the gentry ; always begging for something, and not averse to recounting his own services, merits and distresses. He describes himself, when seeking an appointment in these parts, as never having had any other profession but his sword, nor other fortunes than the war ; and he adds pathetically that his debts are clamorous...
Page 76 - ... populace can hardly be conceived when it was ascertained that a reprieve from the governor came a few minutes after her spirit had been hastened away. They gathered that evening around the residence of Sheriff Packer, (the locality of Richard...
Page 137 - ... a substantial payer of stocks and place the same in said kage, and build on the rough a firm pillory; all to be built and raised in some convenient space from the westward of the meeting-house." In 1669 there was "granted to Mr. Ffryer the town's right to twentie foote square of land neere the meeting-house to sett up a house and keep wood in to accommodate himself and family in winter time when he comes to meeting.
Page 11 - ... the sagamore of Naponsett, died, and many of his people. The disease was the small pox. Some of them were cured by such means as they had from us; many of their children escaped, and were kept by the English. Capt. Wiggin of Pascataquack wrote to the...

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