The Creation of the American Republic, 1776-1787

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University of North Carolina Press, 1998 - History - 653 pages
15 Reviews
During the Revolutionary era, American political theory underwent a fundamental transformation that carried the nation out of a basically classical and medieval world of political discussion into a milieu that was recognizably modern. This classic work is

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Review: The Creation of the American Republic, 1776-1787

User Review  - Ryan Welch - Goodreads

This book definitely assumes a certain familiarity with the subject matter (a background in law wouldn't hurt either). I really have neither of these prerequisites but still found the book to be ... Read full review

Review: The Creation of the American Republic, 1776-1787

User Review  - Mark Singer - Goodreads

Essential for an understanding of how the American Republic was created, from the Declaration of Independence, through the Articles of Confederation and ending with the creation and adoption of the ... Read full review

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About the author (1998)

History professor and award-winning author Gordon S. Wood was born in Concord, Massachusetts on November 27, 1933. After graduating in 1955 from Tufts University he served in the US Air Force in Japan and earned his master's degree from Harvard University. In 1964, Wood earned his Ph. D. in history from Harvard, and he taught there, as well as at the College of William and Mary and the University of Michigan, before joining the Brown University faculty in 1969. Wood has published a number of articles and books, including The Creation of the American Republic, 1776-1787, which won the Bancroft Prize and the John H. Dunning Prize in 1970, and The Radicalism of the American Revolution, winner of the Pulitzer Prize for History and the Ralph Waldo Emerson Prize in 1993. He has won many other awards in the past five decades from organizations such as the American Historical Association, the New York Historical Society, and the Fraunces Tavern Museum. Wood is a fellow of both the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the American Philosophical Society. In 2014, his book, The American Revolution: A History, was on the New York Times bestseller list.