A Narrative of the Operations of a Small British Force: Under the Command of Brigadier-General Sir Samuel Auchmuty, Employed in the Reduction of Monte Video, on the River Plate, A.D. 1807 (Google eBook)

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J. Stockdale, 1807 - Montevideo (Uruguay) - 60 pages
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Relato del asalto a Montevideo 1807

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Page 29 - ... down before the town. From the best information I could obtain, I was led to believe that the defences of Monte Video were weak, and the garrison by no means disposed to make an obstinate resistance ; but I found the works truly respectable, with one hundred and sixty pieces of cannon ; and they were ably defended.
Page 32 - Our loss during the siege was trifling, particularly as we were not sheltered by approaches, and the enemy's fire of shot and shell was incessant. But it is painful for me to add, that it was great at the assault. Many most valuable officers are among the killed and wounded.
Page 31 - The 4Oth regiment, with Colonel Browne, followed. They also missed the breach, and twice passed through the fire of the batteries before they found it. The 87th regiment was posted near the North Gate,, which the troops who entered at the breach were to open for them, but their ardour was so great, that they could not wait : they scaled the walls, and entered the town as the troops within approached it.
Page 31 - ... troops advanced in all directions, clearing the streets and batteries with their bayonets, and overturning their cannon. The 40th regiment, with colonel Browne, followed. They also missed the breach, and twice passed through the fire of the batteries before they found it.
Page 28 - ... men, and a number of guns. They advanced in two columns ; the right, consisting of cavalry, to turn our left flank, while the other, of infantry, attacked the left of our line ; this column pushed in our advanced posts, and pressed so hard on our out piquet of 400 men, that Col.
Page 39 - The distance which the ships lay from the shore, with the- almost constant high winds and swell we had, and the great way every thing was to be dragged by the seamen, up a heavy sandy road, made the duty excessively laborious. The squadron had almost daily fourteen hundredmen on shore, and this ship was often left with only thirty men on board. The defence made by the enemy protracted the siege longer than was expected, and...
Page 31 - Renny, of t&ie 40th Light Infantry, who pointed it out, and gloriously fell as he mounted it. Our gallant soldiers rushed to it: and difficult as it was of access, forced their way into the town. Cannon were placed at the head of the principal streets, and their fire, for a short time, was destructive ; but the troops advanced in all directions, clearing the streets and batteries with their bayonets, and overturning their cannon.
Page 30 - ... the Enemy, which had been incessant during the whole of the siege, a breach was reported practicable on the 2d instant. Many reasons induced me not to delay the assault, though I was aware the Troops would be exposed to a very heavy fire in approaching and mounting the breach. Orders were issued for the attack an hour before day-break the ensuing morning, and a summons was sent to the Governor in the evening to surrender the town. To this message no answer was returned. The Troops destined for...
Page 33 - I have received from htm the most friendly attention, and every thing in his power to grant. The Captains and Officers of the Navy have been equally zealous to assist us; but I feel particularly indebted to Captains Donnelly and Palmer for their great exertions. They commanded a Corps of Marines and Seamen that were landed, and were essentially useful to us with the guns, and in the batteries, as well as in bringing up the ordnance and stores. This Dispatch will be delivered to you by Major Tucker,...
Page 31 - At the appointed hour the troops marched to the assault. They approached near the breach before they were discovered, when a destructive fire from every gun that could bear upon it, and from the musketry of the garrison, opened upon them. Heavy as it was, our loss would have been comparatively trifling if the breach had been open, but during the night, and under our fire, the enemy had barricadoed it with hides, so as to render it nearly impracticable.

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