Sounds of Our Times: Two Hundred Years of Acoustics (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Springer Science & Business Media, 1999 - Science - 444 pages
1 Review
But at my back I always hear Time's winged chariot hurrying near. Andrew Marvell (1621-1678) In writing this book, I acknowledge two important predecessors. In 1930, Professor Dayton C. Miller, of Case Institute, wrote his Anecdotal History of Acoustics, which followed mainly the individual work of a hundred or so acousticians, up to about 1930. And in 1978, Origins in Acoustics by Profes sor F.V. ("Ted") Hunt of Harvard appeared. Professor Hunt had not com pleted his book at the time of his death in 1972, but portions of it were published posthumously under the editorship of Professor Robert Apfel of Yale. This book begins roughly where the published portions of Hunt's work left off-the period at the beginning of the nineteenth century-and moves forward into the modern era. Because of the vast amount of acoustical research in this period, the personal and anecdotal style of Professor Miller's book did not seem appropriate. On the other hand, my age sug gested to me that I might have not have the time for pursuing the intense but time-consuming scholarship of Professor Hunt (note the quotation above). I have therefore tried to steer a middle course between Miller and Hunt, and have also relied more on secondary sources.
  

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User Review  - name99 - LibraryThing

A history of acoustics over the last two hundred years. Not the most scintillating writing, and I wish a lot of the material mentioned had been discussed as science, not just as history, but basically it did what I wanted it to do which was to give me an overview of acoustics beyond the basics. Read full review

Contents

The State of Acoustics in 1800
1
Chladni and Young
2
12 Sound Propagation
4
Sound Velocity in Liquids and Solids
6
Diffraction Reflection
7
Echoes
8
13 Sound Production
9
The Human Voice
11
Atmospheric Acoustics
195
Aeroacoustics
197
Cavitation
202
76 Structural Vibrations
204
77 Noise
206
78 Hearing
207
79 Speech
210
710 Musical Acoustics
216

Artificial Voice
12
Vibrating Strings
13
Vibrating Plates
14
Singing Flames
15
14 Sound Reception
17
Teaching of the Deaf
19
Tartini Tones
20
Overview
21
Acoustics 18001850
27
22 Artificial Sources of Sound
29
23 The Human Voice
31
24 The Tuning Fork
32
The Adiabatic Sound Velocity
33
26 Velocity of the Sound in a Solid
36
27 Sound and Vibrations in Two Dimensions
37
29 Sound Absorption in Fluids
39
210 FiniteAmplitude Sound
40
211 Sound Reception
41
The Stroboscope
42
213 Fourier Analysis
44
214 The Stethoscope
45
215 Hearing
46
216 Room Acoustics
48
217 Teaching of the Deaf
50
von Helmholtz and Tyndall
55
32 On Sensations of Tone
57
Combinations of Vibrations
58
The Ear
63
Interruptions of Harmony
65
The Relationship of Musical Tones
68
33 John Tyndall 18201893 Fig 38
70
On Sound
72
Notes and References
79
Lord Rayleigh and His Book
83
42 His First Researches
85
43 His Interaction with Tyndall
87
44 Summary of his Later Career
89
46 The Theory of Sound
90
47 The Period 18771894Between Editions
91
The Rayleigh Disk
92
Vibration Theory
93
Musical Acoustics
94
Aeroacoustics
95
Surface Waves
97
48 The Second Edition of The Theory of Sound 1894
99
Inventors to the Fore
103
52 Joseph Henry
104
53 Henry and the Telegraph
107
First Stirrings
108
56 Alexander Graham Bell The Early Years
111
57 Bells Telephone
114
58 Thomas Alva Edison Fig 59
119
59 Further Work on the Telephone
120
510 The Phonograph
123
Overview
126
The Last Half of the Nineteenth Century
131
62 Sound Absorption in Fluids
133
63 Vibrating Systems
134
64 Structural Vibrations
136
66 The Birth of Seismology
137
67 Devices for Making Sound Visible
138
68 Shock Waves
144
69 Nonlinear Acoustics
148
610 Hearing
150
611 Speech
154
612 Music
155
613 Architectural Acoustics
158
614 Harbingers of the Future
160
Magnetostriction
162
Piezoelectricity
163
AcoustoOptics
166
Response to Stimuli
168
Overview
169
The Twentieth Century The First Quarter
177
The Microphone
178
Amplifiers Vacuum Tubes and Vacuum Tube Amplifiers
182
The Oscillator
183
The Oscilloscope
184
Acoustic Impedance
185
72 Architectural Acoustics
186
73 Physical Acoustics
191
711 The Origin of the Decibel
219
Overview
222
The Second Quarter of the Twentieth Century
231
81 The Acoustical Society of America
232
82 Ultrasonic Absorption and Dispersion
234
Liquids Experimental
235
Liquids Theoretical
238
83 Other Ultrasonic Effects in Fluids
241
LowTemperature Acoustics
242
84 Ultrasound in Solids
244
85 Medical Ultrasonics
245
86 Other Applications of Ultrasonics
246
87 Nonlinear Acoustics
247
88 Atmospheric Acoustics and Aeroacoustics
248
89 Underwater Sound
249
810 Bioacoustics
255
Echolocation by Bats
258
812 Noise and its Control
260
813 Architectural Acoustics
263
814 Physiological Acoustics
264
815 Psychological Acoustics
270
Quantification of Psychoacoustics
271
Loudness
272
Pitch
274
Masking and Time Resolution
275
816 Speech
276
817 Music
282
Overview
285
The Third Quarter 19501975
299
91 Societies and Journals
300
92 Physical Acoustics
301
Creeping Waves
302
Ultrasonics in Fluids
304
LowTemperature Acoustics
307
93 Ultrasonics in Solids
310
94 Aeroacoustics
314
95 More Nonlinear Acoustics
316
96 Underwater Sound
317
97 Animal Echolocation
324
98 Signal Processing
325
910 Seismic Waves
326
Sources
327
Effects of Noise on Man and Animals
331
Noise Reduction
332
912 Architectural Acoustics
334
913 Physiological Acoustics
340
The Ear Passage
341
Cochlear Mechanics
342
914 Psychological Acoustics
344
Pitch
346
915 Speech
347
Speech Production
348
Speech Intelligibility
352
Speech Recognition
353
916 Music
356
Overview
358
Notes and References
359
Acoustics 19751995 and Beyond Fin de siecleAgain
375
102 Nonlinear Acoustics Radiation Pressure and Levitation
376
103 Solitons
377
104 Chaos
379
106 Underwater Sound Internal Waves
383
107 Global Scale Acoustics
384
109 Weakly Absorbing Media
386
1010 Structural Acoustics and Vibration Fuzzy Structural Acoustics
387
Active Sound and Vibration Control
389
1011 Architectural Acoustics Auditorium Design
390
1012 Acoustic Instrumentation
393
Otoacoustic Emission
397
Aids to the Deaf and Hard of Hearing
398
Hearing Aids
399
Cochlear Implants
401
Hair Cell Regeneration
404
1014 Psychological Acoustics
406
A Final View
409
Notes and References
410
A Book Review by Herman von Helmholtz Nature 17 237239 Jan 24 1878
419
Name Index
429
Subject Index
441
Copyright

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Page vii - But at my back I always hear Time's winged chariot hurrying near; And yonder all before us lie Deserts of vast eternity.

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About the author (1999)

Robert T. Beyer is Hazard Professor of Physics Emeritus at Brown University.

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