The Psychology of Blacks: An African-centered Perspective

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Prentice Hall, 1999 - Psychology - 194 pages
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This book highlights the limitations of traditional psychological theories and approaches when applied to African descent people. It provides information on how the African Centered Perspective is defined, as well as how it operates in the context of the African American family with regard to identity development, education, mental health, research, and managing contemporary issues. It links the context of African American life to the traditions, values and spiritual essence of their African ancestors in an attempt to acknowledge the African worldview and assist the African American community in addressing some of the challenges they will face in the 21st century. Includes a thorough annotated bibliography for further reading.African Centered Psychology in the Modern Era, The African American Family, The Struggle for Identity Congruence, Psychological Issues in Education, Contemporary Approaches to Developmental Psychology, Mental Health Issues, Praxis in African American Psychology: Theoretical and Methodological Considerations, African Centered Psychology and Issues in the 21st Century.Psychologists or counselors working with the African American population.

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Contents

The AfricanAmerican Family
24
The Struggle for Identity Congruence in AfricanAmericans
40
Psychological Issues in the Education of African
54
Copyright

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About the author (1999)

Thomas A. Parham, Ph.D.: Dr. Thomas A. Parham is Assistant Vice Chancellor for Counseling and Health Services and an adjunct faculty member at the University of California, Irvine. Dr. Parham is a Past President and Distinguished Psychologist of the National Association of Black Psychologists (ABPsi), a Past President of the Association for Multicultural Counseling and Development (a division of ACA), and a Fellow in both the American Psychological Association, as well as ACA.

White is Professor Emeritus of Psychology and Psychiatry at the University of California at Irvine

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