Report of the Annual Meeting (Google eBook)

Front Cover
J. Murray, 1901 - Science
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Contents

Keish Caves co Sligo Interim lieport of the Committee consisting of
282
Lifezones in the British Carboniferous Rocks Report of the Committee
288
The Structure of Crystals Report of the Committee consisting of Professor
297
The Movements of Underground Waters of Northwest Yorkshire Second
337
Ossiferous Caves at Uphill Report of the Committee consisting of Professor
352
Plankton and Physical Conditions of the English Channel 18991900
353
Index Animalium Report of the Committee consisting of Dr Henry Wood
362
Investigations made at the Marine Biological Laboratory Plymouth Report
376
Changes of the Land Level of the Phlegrrean Fields Report of a Committee
382
The Climatology of Africa Tenth and Final Report of a Committee con
383
The Survey of British Protectorates Report of the Committee consisting
396
The Resistance of Road Vehicles to Traction Report of the Committee con
402
Ethnological Survey of Canada Report of the Committee consisting
409
Silchester Excavation Report of the Committee consisting of Mr Arthur
425
Explorations in Crete Report of the Committee consisting of Sir John
440
The Chemistry of Bone Marrow Interim Report of the Committee consisting
447
The Teaching of Science in Elementary Schools Report of the Committee
458
Corresponding Societies Committee Report of the Committee consisting
465
Physics
531
The Essentials of a Machine for the Accurate Measurement of Celestial
541
Note on the Variation of the Specific Heat of Water By Professor
547
The Puiseux Diagram and Differential Equations By R W H
555
A New Point of View about GravitatioD and a proposed Experiment
561
A Discussion on Glass used for Scientific Purposes Opened by a Paper
568
Meteorology
577
Section B CHEMISTRY
584
Humus and the Irreducible Residue in the Bacterial Treatment
603
The Existence of Certain Semicarbazides in more than one Modification
609
Food By W Thomson F R S E
613
Report on the Plankton and Physical Conditions of the English Channel p 353
683
Some Notes on the Behaviour of young Gulls artificially and naturally hatched By Professor J Arthxtr Thomson M A p 378
685
The Fishes of the Coats Arctic Expedition By W S Bruce F R S G S
687
On the Mechanism of the Frogs Tongue By Professor Marcus IIartos and Nevil Maskelyne 088
688
On a new Form of Luminous Organ By William E Hoyle M A
689
Zebras and Zebra Hybrids By Professor J Cossar Ewart M D
691
Exhibition of Abnormal Specimens of Nephrops By F H Marshall
692
The Land Crustaceans of a Coral Maud By L A Borradaile M A
693
Francisco P Moreno
696
The Influence of Geographical Environment on Political Evolution
716
MONDAY SEPTEMBER 16
722
G Travels in China By E Looan Jack LL D F R G S
726
The Growth and Geographical Distribution of Lunacy in Scotland
742
Food and Land Tenure By E Atkinson
748
WEDNESDAY SEPTEMBER 18
757
Address by Colonel R E Crompion M Inst C E President of the Section 701
768
Report on the Small Screw Gauge p 407
774
Notes on the Excavation of an ancient Kitchen Midden recently dis
790
The Frequency and Pigmentation Value of Surnames of School Children
799
WEDNESDAY SEPTEMBER 18
805
Horn and Bone Implements found in Ipswich By Miss NrNA F Layabd
806
MONDAY SEPTEMBER 16
818
Address by Professor I Bayley Balfour D fk F R S President of
819
Report on Fertilisation in Phteophyceie p 448
836
Note on an Ophioglosmm collected by Mr Ridley By Professor F
842
TUESDAY SEPTEMBER 17
848
WEDNESDAY SEPTEMBER 18
854
Some Considerations bearing on the Practical Study of Educational
869
PLATE
893

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Page xxxii - Committees for the several Sections before the beginning of the Meeting. It has therefore become necessary, in order to give an opportunity to the Committees of doing justice to the several Communications, that each Author should prepare an Abstract of his Memoir, of a length suitable for insertion in the published Transactions of the Association, and...
Page 13 - It is hardly necessary to add that anything which any insulated body or system of bodies can continue to furnish without limitation cannot possibly be a material substance ; and it appears to me to be extremely difficult, if not quite impossible, to form any distinct idea of anything capable of being excited and communicated in the manner in which heat was excited and communicated in these experiments except it be motion.
Page 457 - It is a place which wins the admiration of the young by its celebrity, kindles the affections of the middle-aged by its beauty, and rivets the fidelity of the old by its associations. It is a seat of wisdom, a light of the world, a minister of the faith, an Alma Mater of the rising generation.
Page 665 - Throughout this chapter and elsewhere I have spoken of selection as the paramount power, yet its action absolutely depends on what we in our ignorance call spontaneous or accidental variability. Let an architect be compelled to build an edifice with uncut stones, fallen from a precipice. The shape of each fragment may be called accidental; yet the shape of each has been determined by...
Page 241 - ... responsible for the administration of the household. A consideration of the household offices and their personnel, both superior and inferior, is of the utmost importance, and that consideration will lead naturally on to an appreciation of their place in and influence upon the administration of the kingdom. It is not necessary to make more than- a passing reference to the way in which in feudal states the officers of the king's household became great officers with a share in the government of...
Page xxxii - It has therefore become necessary, in order to give an opportunity to the Committees of doing justice to the several communications, that each Author should prepare an Abstract of his Memoir, of a length suitable for insertion in the published Transactions of the Association, and that he should send it, together with the original Memoir, by book-post, on or before August 1 1, addressed thus : — " General Secretaries, British Association, 22 Albemarle Street, London, W.
Page xxix - To give a stronger impulse and a more systematic direction to scientific inquiry, — to promote the intercourse of those who cultivate Science in different parts of the British Empire, with one another, and with foreign philosophers, — to obtain a more general attention to the objects of Science, and a removal of any disadvantages of a public kind which impede its progress.
Page 462 - Special — The application of Mathematics and Science to specific industries. Machine Construction, Building Construction, Naval Architecture, Electrical Industries, Mining, Navigation, Agriculture, Horticulture, or any other industry the scientific principles underlying which admit of systematic exposition. Where the nature of the subject requires it, previous or concurrent study of (G) (a), or of the related branch of (E) or of (F) will be made a condition of taking any subject under (G) (b).
Page 14 - ... to decide the cause before it has been heard. We must therefore adhere to the standpoint adopted by most scientific men, viz., that the question of the existence of ultra-physical entities, such as atoms and the ether, is to be settled by the evidence, and must not be ruled out as inadmissible on a priori grounds. On the other hand, it is impossible to deny that, if the mere entry on the search for the concealed causes of physical phenomena is not a trespass on ground we have no right to explore,...
Page xxix - Its objects are— to give a stronger impulse, and a more systematic direction to scientific enquiry...

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