The Moral Sense (Google eBook)

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Simon and Schuster, Nov 6, 1997 - Social Science - 336 pages
6 Reviews
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Review: The Moral Sense

User Review  - Jeff Delisle - Goodreads

I first heard of Dr. Wilson after recently reading glowing obituaries in many respected publications. His teaching and publications have been influential to many better known authorities. As I am a ... Read full review

Review: The Moral Sense

User Review  - Peter - Goodreads

Confirms JHBreasted's work on ancient Egypt. Guess what, morality does not come from Christianity. See Greek philophy, see ancient Egypt. Read full review

Contents

Sympathy
29
Fairness
55
SelfControl
79
Duty
99
The Social Animal
121
Families
141
Gender
165
The Universal Aspiration
191
The Moral Sense and Human Character
225
79
303
191
312
Copyright

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Page 30 - How selfish soever man may be supposed, there are evidently some principles in his nature, which interest him in the fortune of others, and render their happiness necessary to him, though he derives nothing from it except the pleasure of seeing it.
Page 13 - Force is a physical power, and I fail to see what moral effect it can have. To yield to force is an act of necessity, not of will — at the most, an act of prudence. In what sense can it be a duty? Suppose for a moment that this so-called "right

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About the author (1997)

James Q. Wilson most recently taught at Boston College and Pepperdine University. He was Professor Emeritus of Management and Public Administration at UCLA and was previously Shattuck Professor of Government at Harvard University. He wrote more than a dozen books on the subjects of public policy, bureaucracy, and political philosophy. He was president of the American Political Science Association, and he is the only political scientist to win three of the four lifetime achievement awards presented by the APSA. He received the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the nation's highest civilian award, in 2003. Professor Wilson passed away in March of 2012 after battling cancer. His work helped shape the field of political science in the United States. His many years of service to his American Government book remain evident on every page and will continue for many editions to come.

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