Neuropsychology: From Theory to Practice

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Psychology Press, 2001 - Psychology - 608 pages
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This comprehensive textbook provides an up-to-date and accessible account of the theories that seek to explain the complex relationship between brain and behaviour. Drawing on the latest research findings from the disciplines of neuropsychology, neuroscience, cognitive neuroscience and cognitive neuropsychology, the author provides contemporary models of neuropsychological processes. The book provides a fresh perspective that takes into account the modern advances of functional neuroimaging and other new research techniques.
The emphasis at all times is on bridging the gap between theory and practice - discussion of theoretical models is framed in a clinical context and the author makes frequent use of case studies to illustrate the clinical context. There is coverage of the neuropsychology of disorders associated with areas such as perception, attention, memory and language, emotion, and movement. A third-generation text, this book uniquely aims to integrate these different areas by describing the common influences of these functions. Following on from this there is information on the clinical management of patients in the area of recovery and rehabilitation. These last chapters focus on the author's own experience and illustrate the importance of a more systematic approach to intervention, which takes into account theoretical views of recovery from brain damage.
Neuropsychology: From Theory to Practiceis the first comprehensive textbook to cover research from all disciplines committed to understanding neuropsychology. It will provide a valuable resource for students, professionals and clinicians.
  

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Contents

An introduction to modern neuropsychology
1
Functional neuroanatomy
2
An introduction to historical and modern research perspectives within neuropsychology
15
A guide to issues covered
31
Disorders of perception
35
Visual sensation
37
hierarchical and parallel modular systems
41
Clinical disorders of perception
49
A model of language disorders
298
The perisylvian aphasias
302
The transcortical aphasias
319
Subcortical aphasia
325
Language and the right hemisphere
329
Towards a new model of language disorders
332
A COGNITIVE NEUROPSYCHOLOGICAL PERSPECTIVE
338
Acalculia
345

Object recognition
60
The special case of face recognition
64
Awareness of perceptual deficit and imagery
78
Bottomup versus topdown disorders and the executive influence
81
Executive dysfunction
85
Features of executive dysfunction
88
Executive dysfunction following subcortical atrophy
104
Models of the executive system
108
the orbital dorsolateral and medial systems
121
Towards a model of executive function
130
Why executive function?
135
Disorders of attention
139
A brief historical background of theory
140
A clinical description of attention disorders
167
Models of neglect
180
Relationships between attention and perception within attentional disorders
196
Attention and working memory
200
Relationship between terms and attention and process
201
Overview
204
Memory disorders
207
A neuropsychological model of memory
208
Neuropsychological issues and memory disorders
228
Amnesia
238
Theoretical perspectives on retrograde amnesia
253
A neuropsychological model of memory
259
Disorders of cerebral asymmetry
271
The splitbrain operation
275
The splitbrain disconnection syndromes
277
Alien hand and conscious awareness
285
The clinical presentation of disconnection syndrome
286
Recovery from splitbrain surgery
287
The nature of interhemispheric integration
288
Language disorders
291
Historical notes
292
the example of anomia
295
The agraphias
349
Alexia and agraphia
351
The acquired dyslexias
353
Final comment
360
Movement disorders
363
The primary motor and sensory areas
365
The cortical motor system
370
Apraxia and the motor engram
375
The basal ganglia system
380
The cerebellum system
390
General summary
394
Emotional disorders
397
The emotional system
401
Further aspects of emotional and social dysfunction from the clinical perspective
424
Theories of lateralised emotional expressions within the clinical context
426
Neuropsychological theories of emotional and social dysfunction in psychiatric conditions
433
General summary
444
Recovery from brain damage
449
Mechanisms of recovery
451
a clinical perspective
464
Factors that encourage recovery
472
Rehabilitation
477
The application of techniques
481
The limitations of the patient
488
General comments
497
Addendum 1
498
Addendum 2
499
Integration between neuropsychological functions
501
the influence of past experience on memory attention perception and language
502
Attention within perception
503
Appendix
505
References
509
Author Index
575
Subject Index
593
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About the author (2001)

David Andrewes is Associate Professor of Psychology at the University of Melbourne.

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