History of the Twelfth Massachusetts Volunteers (Webster Regiment) (Google eBook)

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Twelfth (Webster) regiment association, 1882 - United States - 167 pages
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Page 89 - General : I have placed you at the head of the Army of the Potomac. Of course I have done this upon what appear to me to be sufficient reasons, and yet I think it best for you to know that there are some things in regard to which I am not quite satisfied with you. I believe you to be a brave and skilful soldier, which, of course, I like.
Page 89 - ... brother officer. I have heard, in such a way as to believe it, of your recently saying that both the Army and the Government needed a Dictator. Of course, it was not for this, but in spite of it, that I have given you the command. Only those generals who gain successes, can set up dictators. What I now ask of you is military success, and I will risk the dictatorship. The government will support you to the utmost of its ability, which is neither more nor less than it has done and will do for all...
Page 58 - Let us study the probable lines of retreat of our opponents, and leave our own to take care of themselves. Let us look before us and not behind. Success and glory are in the advance. Disaster and shame lurk in the rear. Let us act on this understanding, and it is safe to predict that your banners shall be inscribed with many a glorious deed, and that your names will be dear to your countrymen forever.
Page 89 - What I now ask of you is military success, and I will risk the dictatorship. The government will support you to the utmost of its ability, which is neither more nor less than it has done and will do for all commanders. I much fear that the spirit which you have aided to infuse into the army, of criticising their commander and withholding confidence from him, will now turn upon you. I shall assist you as far as I can to put it down. Neither you nor Napoleon, if he were alive again, could get any good...
Page 57 - taking strong positions and holding them," of "lines of retreat," and of "bases of supplies.
Page 57 - To the Officers and Soldiers of the Army of Virginia: " By special assignment of the President of the United States, I have assumed command of this army. I have spent two weeks in learning your whereabouts, your condition, and your wants; in preparing you for active operations, and in placing you in positions from which you can act promptly and to the purpose. " I have come to you from the West, where we have always seen the backs...
Page 57 - I have come to you from the West, where we have always seen the backs of our enemies, from an army whose business it has been to seek the adversary, and beat him when found, whose policy has been attack, not defense.
Page 89 - I believe you to be a brave and skilful soldier, which of course I like. I also believe you do not mix politics with your profession, in which you are right. You have confidence in yourself, which is a valuable if not an indispensable quality. You are ambitious, which, within reasonable bounds, does good rather than harm ; but I think that during General Burnside's command of the army you have taken counsel of your ambition and thwarted him as much as you could, in which you did a great wrong to...
Page 125 - In relinquishing command, I take occasion to express the pride and pleasure I have experienced in my connection with you, and my profound regret at our separation. Identified by its services with the history of the war, the First Corps gave at Gettysburg a crowning proof of valor and endurance in saving from the grasp of the enemy the strong position upon which the battle was fought. The terrible losses suffered by the corps in that conflict attest its supreme devotion to the country.
Page 57 - The strongest position a soldier should desire to occupy is one from which he can most easily advance against the enemy. " Let us study the probable lines of retreat of our opponents, and leave our own to take care of themselves. " Let us look before, and not behind. " Success and glory are in the advance disaster and shame lurk in the rear.

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