The Bookman's Manual: A Guide to Literature (Google eBook)

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R.R. Bowker Company, 1921 - Best books - 434 pages
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Page 122 - Excursion," a fragment which is called the key to all his poetical works. Wordsworth said: "Every great poet is a teacher, and I wish either to be considered as a teacher or as nothing." This confusion of the office of poet with the office of moralist made much of Wordsworth's poetry tedious. John Morley in his "Studies in Literature
Page 123 - All that he did excellently might be bound up in twenty pages, but it should be bound in pure gold." Coleridge was a poet of "magnificent beginnings"; he rarely completed anything. "Kubla Khan," "an ecstasy of sound," was left unfinished, and "Christabel," "a splendid fragment," stops short in the second part.
Page 122 - The intention to instruct, to improve the occasion, is too deliberate and too hardly pressed." Wordsworth is a poet who can be known to his best advantage in selections. Walter Pater said: "Of all poets equally great he would gain most by a skilfully made anthology." COLERIDGE, SAMUEL TAYLOR. 1772—1834. Poems. Burt, Home.
Page 404 - MlFFLIN COMPANY. American Commonwealths. 19 vols. Histories of those states which have a striking political, social, or economic history. American Statesmen. 31 vols. Biographies of men famous in the political history of the United States. American Statesmen. Second Series. 3 vols. Lives of
Page 199 - War God. Macmillan. Plaster Saints. Macmillan. Zangwill's plays all belong to "the drama of social criticism." The conception of America in his masterpiece as "God's crucible, the great melting pot where all the races of Europe are melting and refining" is so adequately set forth that many critics feel that "the great American drama" has been written by an Englishman. BENNETT, ARNOLD. 1867 — Cupid and Commonsense. Doran.
Page 222 - Bacon is the greatest of the serious and stately essayists—-Montaigne the greatest of the garrulous and communicative. . . . Bacon always seems to write with his ermine on. Montaigne was different from all this. His table of contents reads in comparison like a medley, or a catalogue of an auction."—A. Smith. LAMB, CHARLES. 1775—1834.
Page 393 - peculiarly unfit for historical composition. He carries his love of effect far beyond the limits of moderation. He tells a fine story finely: but he cannot tell a plain story plainly. ... In the delineation of character, Tacitus is unrivalled among historians, and has very few superiors among dramatists and novelists." HISTORIANS OF ANCIENT GREECE AND ROME GIBBON, EDWARD. 1737—1794. \ The Decline and Fall of the Roman
Page 410 - A Short History of the English People, 2 vols., Burt; Dutton, Everyman's; i vol., Burt; American Book. A Short History of the English People. Illustrated Edition, (Edited by Mrs. JR Green and K. Norgate.) 4 vols., Harper.
Page 277 - which sharply differentiates Russian literature from the literature of England, France. Spain, Italy, and even that of Germany. Russia is old; her literature is new. Russian history goes back to the ninth century; Russian literature, so far as it interests the world begins in the nineteenth. Russian literature and American literature are twins."—WILLIAM LYON PHELPS.
Page 2 - This is the first history of booksellers ever written. The author undertook the work after reading a statement of Thomas Carlyle's: "In these days, ten ordinary histories of kings and courtiers were well exchanged against the tenth part of one good History of Booksellers." Curwen treats only of English booksellers, including such names as Longman, Constable, Murray, Moxon, Nelson, Mudie. MUMBY, FRANK ARTHUR. The Romance of Bookselling. London, Chapman

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