What We Knew: Terror, Mass Murder, and Everyday Life in Nazi Germany

Front Cover
Basic Books, 2006 - History - 434 pages
34 Reviews
Drawing on interviews with four thousand German Jews and non-Jewish Germans who experienced the Third Reich firsthand, presents an oral history of life in Nazi Germany, addressing such issues as guilt and ignorance concerning the mass murder of European Jews, anti-Semitism, and the popular appeal of Hitler and National Socialism.

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Review: What We Knew: Terror, Mass Murder, and Everyday Life in Nazi Germany

User Review  - Richard - Goodreads

Very interesting collection of interviews but I don't necessarily agree with their conclusions. Fortunately, their questionable methodology and conclusions don't really matter because the main attraction here are all the interviews, which are amazing. Read full review

Review: What We Knew: Terror, Mass Murder, and Everyday Life in Nazi Germany

User Review  - John Ghekiere - Goodreads

Here's my haunting take away. Humans aren't different in 2014 than they were in the 1940's. Everything that enabled the turning of heads in light of such atrocities is still with us. The everyday ... Read full review

References to this book

Understanding Race and Crime
Webster
No preview available - 2007
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About the author (2006)

Eric A. Johnson is the author of Urbanization and Crime: Germany 1871-1914 and The Civilization of Crime: Violence in Town and Country Since the Middle Ages. A professor of history at Central Michigan University and a fellow of The Netherlands Institute for Advanced Study, he lives in Mt. Pleasant, Michigan. Karl-Heinz Reuband is professor of Sociology at the University of Dusseldorf. He lives in Dusseldorf, Germany.

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