American and other drinks (Google eBook)

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1878
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Page 34 - ... up one-third, or perhaps a little less. Then take rasped or pounded ice, and fill up the tumbler. Epicures rub the lips of the tumbler with a piece of fresh pineapple, and the tumbler itself is very often incrusted outside with stalactites of ice. As the ice melts, you drink.
Page 34 - ... or perhaps a little less. Then take rasped or pounded ice, and fill up the tumbler. Epicures rub the lips of the tumbler with a piece of fresh pineapple, and the tumbler itself is very often incrusted outside with stalactites of ice. As the ice melts, you drink. I once overheard two ladies talking in the next room to me, and one of them said ' Well, if I have a weakness for any one thing, it is for a mint julep!
Page 59 - Dissolve four or five lumps of sugar in a quarter of a pint of boiling water, with a little very thin lemon peel ; let it stand a quarter of an hour ; add one bottle of the above wines ; three or four leaves of burrage, or...
Page 44 - In making preparations like the above, it is very difficult to give the exact proportions of ingredients like sugar and spice, as what quantity might suit one person would be to another quite distasteful. Boil the spice in the water until the flavour is extracted, then add the wine and sugar, and bring the whole to the boiling-point, when serve with strips of crisp dry toast, or with biscuits.
Page 28 - Take two large fresh lemons with rough skins, quite ripe, and some large lumps of double-refined sugar. Rub the sugar over the lemons till it has absorbed all the yellow part of the skins. Then put into the bowl these lumps, and as much more as...
Page 28 - ... water that has boiled, put to it fifteen pounds of double-refined sugar, and when well mixed pour it upon the brandy and peels, adding the juice of the oranges and of twenty-four lemons ; mix well, then strain through a very fine hair-sieve into a very clean barrel that has held spirits, and put two quarts of new milk. Stir, and then bung it close ; let it stand six weeks in a warm cellar ; bottle the liquor for use, observing great care that the bottles are perfectly clean and dry, and the corks...
Page 29 - ... this depends much on taste, and on the strength of the spirit. As the pulp is disagreeable to some persons, the sherbet may be strained before the liquor is put in. Some strain the lemon before they put it to the sugar, which is improper ; as when the pulp and sugar are well mixed together, it adds much to the richness of the punch. When only rum is used, about half a pint of porter will soften the punch ; and even when both rum and brandy are used, the porter gives a richness, and to some a...
Page 34 - I must, however, descant a little upon the mint-julep, as it is, with the thermometer at 100°, one of the most delightful and insinuating potations that ever was invented, and may be drunk with equal satisfaction when the thermometer is as low as 70°.
Page 63 - ... (but no pips), and pour over the whole a quart of boiling water. When the sugar is dissolved, strain the lemonade through a fine sieve or piece of muslin, and, when cool, it will be ready for use. The lemonade will be much improved by having the white of an egg beaten up in it ; a little sherry mixed with it, also, makes this beverage much nicer. Average cost, 6d. per quart. LEMONADE. — " There is a current opinion among women...

References from web pages

Category:Swizzles - The Webtender Wiki
American and other drinks, by Leo Engel, 1878. "It occurred to the Author of this little work, after a conversation with an Indian gentleman, ...
wiki.webtender.com/ wiki/ Category:Swizzles

Martini, Straight Up
American and Other Drinks. London. 1882.* Johnson, Harry. New and Improved Illustrated Bartender's Manual or How To Mix Drinks of the Present Style. ...
www.geocities.com/ martinisu/ barman.html

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