Gardening for the South: or, The kitchen and fruit garden: with the best methods for their cultivation, together with hints upon landscape and flower gardening. Containing modes of culture, and descriptions of the species and varieties of the culinary vegetables; fruit trees and fruits, and a select list of ornamental trees and plants, found by trial adapted to the states of the Union south of Pennsylvania; with gardening calendars for the same (Google eBook)

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C. M. Saxton and company, 1857 - Gardening - 402 pages
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Page 80 - ... enfeebled by overbearing. (This principle deserves especial attention, as its application is of great importance.) " 3. The sap tending always to the extremities of the shoots causes the terminal bud to push with greater vigor than the laterals. According to this principle, when we wish a prolongment of a stem or branch, we should prune to a vigorous wood-bud, and leave no production that can interfere with the action of the. sap on it. " 4. The more the sap is obstructed in its circulation,...
Page 79 - ... parts ; hence, the feeble parts being erect, attract much more sap than the strong parts inclined, and, consequently, make a more vigorous growth, and soon recover their balance. This remedy is more especially applied to espalier trees. " 4. Remove from the vigorous parts the superfluous shoots as early in the season as possible, and from the feeble parts as late as possible. The fewer the number of young shoots there are on a branch, the fewer there are of leaves, and, consequently, the less...
Page 116 - It is most readily distinguished, when of middle size, by its fine pink or flesh-colored gills, and pleasant smell ; in a more advanced stage, the gills become of a chocolate color, and it is then more apt to be confounded with other kinds of dubious quality ; but that species which most nearly resembles it, is slimy to the touch, and destitute of the...
Page 142 - Wash six heads and strip off their outer leaves, either halve or leave them whole, according to their size ; cut into lengths of four inches. Put them into a stew-pan with a cup of broth, or weak white gravy ; stew till tender, then add two spoonfuls of cream, and a little flour and butter seasoned with pepper, salt, and nutmeg, and simmer all together.
Page 80 - When we wish to produce fruit buds on a branch, we prevent a free circulation of the sap by bending the branches, or by making annular or circular incisions on it; and on the contrary, when we wish to change...
Page 62 - ... the tongued part ; then pressing the earth down with his foot, so as to secure the layer, he leaves it without further care. The intention of both tongueing and twisting is to prevent the return of sap from the layer into the main stem, while a small quantity is allowed to rise out of the latter into the former ; the effect of this being to compel the returning sap to organise itself externally as roots, instead of passing downwards below APPLICATION OF PRINCIPLES.
Page 80 - By thus pinching early the strong parts, the flow of sap to such points is checked, and naturally turns to the growing parts that have not been pinched ; this remedy is applicable to trees in all forms. " 6. Lay in the strong shoots on the trellis early, and leave the feeble parts loose as long as possible. Laying in the strong parts obstructs the circulation of the sap in them, and, consequently favors the weak parts that are loose. This is only applicable to espaliers, " 7. In espalier trees, giving...
Page 31 - Stable-manure, and all decomposing animal and vegetable substances, have a tendency to promote the decay of stubborn organic remains in the soil, on the principle that putrescent substances hasten the process of putrefaction in other organic bodies with which they come in contact. Salt, in a small proportion, has been demonstrated by Sir I.
Page 79 - ... will all be appropriated by the growing parts, and they will increase in size and strength. " (3.) Bend the strong parts, and keep the weak erect. The more erect the branches and stem are, the greater will be the flow of sap to the growing parts ; hence, the feeble parts being erect, attract much more sap than the strong parts inclined, and, consequently, make a more vigorous growth and soon...
Page 79 - Hence, in leaving the young shoots on the feeble parts, their leaves attract the sap there, and induce a vigorous growth. " 5. Pinch early the soft extremities of the shoots on the vigorous parts, and as late as possible on the feeble parts, excepting always any shoots which may be too vigorous for their position. By thus pinching early the strong...

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