Ideas concepts doctrine : basic thinking in the United States Air Force (Google eBook)

Front Cover
DIANE Publishing
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Contents

From Air Service to Air Corps
27
Mitchells Early Thinking on Air Power
31
Aviation Is Integrated into Army and Navy
34
General Patrick and the Air Service
39
Establishment of the Army Air Corps
44
The Mitchell Era Reexamined
51
NOTES
53
GROWTH OF THE AIR FORCE IDEA 192641
61
The Air Corps Wins a Foothold
62
Beginnings of the GHQ Air Force
66
Toward a LongRange Bombardment Mission
68
Baker Board Influences Air Organization
70
Organization of the General Headquarters Air Force
73
Development of Doctrine in the Air Corps and GHQ Air Force
75
Beliefs in Bomber Invincibility
78
Thoughts on Air Support Aviation
83
War Department General Staff Reorients Air Programs
84
Efforts to Describe Air Doctrine
88
Aviation in Support of the Monroe Doctrine
89
Mobilization for Western Hemisphere Defense
90
An Air Power Mission for the Air Corps
92
Battle Experience from Europe
96
Mobilizing the Army Air Forces for War
101
Organization of the Army Air Forces
102
Early AAF Organization for Basic Thinking
105
Air Planning for War
108
NOTES
114
Air Force thinking and world war II
127
Many Procedures for Developing Air Doctrine
132
New Conceptions of Tactical Air Power
135
Wartime Work of the AAF Board
138
Official Evaluations of Air Operations
142
Wartime Air Doctrine Development Phases Down
146
Examination of the Strategic Air War
147
Thoughts on Air Organization for War
149
Battling for Air Superiority
151
Effect of Flak and Fighters
155
Problems of Strategic Air Targets
156
Early Strategic Bombing in the PacificFar East
158
Strategic Air against Japan
162
Atomic Attack at Hiroshima and Nagasaki
165
Thoughts on Air Power and Air Force
167
Lessons on Air Superiority
171
Development of Tactical Air Power
173
Importance of Airlift
178
General Arnolds Final Word
180
THE AIR FORCE IN NATIONAL DEFENSE ORGANIZATION AND STRATEGY 194449
191
Key West Agreements on Roles and Missions
196
Unified and Specified Commands
200
Building the Air Forces Internal Structure
201
Postwar Air Organization Plans
203
Recognition of Research and Development
205
General Spaatzs Air Force Reorganization
206
Continuing Thinking about Research and Development
208
Organization of USAF Headquarters
212
The Air Force in the Developing Cold War Strategy
214
Problems of Aircraft Procurement
216
First Policies on Missiles and Rockets
219
Emerging Soviet Threats
221
The Finletter Commission
224
Air Power and the Berlin Airlift
231
Strategic Bombing and the B36 Controversy
237
Fiscal Limits Affected the Military
240
A Collective Defense and Air Power Strategy
245
Investigations of the B36 and Defense Unification
251
NOTES
259
Tactical Air Operations
296
General Vandenberg on Air Power
298
Air Power Stalemates the Communists
302
Rebuilding the Worldwide Air Force
304
Establishment of the Air Force Council
305
ArmyAir Force Accommodations on AirGround Doctrine
306
Air Force Organization Act of 1951
314
95Wing Program
316
Added Requirements for Air Power
320
Air Objectives Expand to 143 Wings
323
Tactical Air and Air Defense Studies
327
Secretary Finletters Assessments
334
Global Air Power and the Korean Armistice
335
Air Power and Armistice Negotiations
336
Air Pressure as a Strategy
340
Evaluations of Air Powers Effects in Korea
345
NOTES
352
THE AIR FORCE WRITES ITS DOCTRINE 194755
365
Air Force Activities in the Field of Joint Doctrine
373
The Air University as a Doctrinal Center
379
Successful Preparation of Air Doctrine Manuals
384
Continuing Air Doctrinal Activity
396
Failing Efforts to Produce Interservice Doctrine
401
Interservice Disagreements on Doctrine
406
NOTES
408
STRATEGIC IMPLICATIONS OF THE NEW LOOK 195357
419
Department of Defense Reorganization
423
New Look Military Force Objectives
424
Massive Retaliation as a Strategy
428
Air Force Views on Massive Retaliation
432
Air Force Thinking on Counterforce and Air Power
433
Efforts to Define Air Power
437
Air Force Positions on Nuclear Stalemate and Limited War
443
Air Thinking on Nuclear Stalemate
445
Limited Wars Are a Problem
447
Emergence of Flexible Response as a Strategy
452
A New New Look Strategy
458
Nuclear Weapons and Limited Wars
461
Increased Acceptance of Flexible Response
465
NOTES
467
MISSILE TECHNOLOGY AND THE AIR FORCE 194560
477
Technological Breakthrough in Ballistic Missiles
485
Soviet Threats Speed Missile Development
493
Decisions for Production and Deployment
496
Interservice Disputes about Antimissile Defense
500
Integrating Missiles into the Air Force
504
Integrating Missiles into the Strategic Air Command
506
Missiles for Air Defense and AirGround Support
520
Aircraft and Missile Projection in Tactical Air Command
523
Development in Continental Air Defense
528
Origins of Aerospace Doctrine in the Air Force
541
Visualizations of Satellites and Space Stations
545
A Concept of Space Superiority
549
NOTES
555
IMPACT OF MISSILES AND SPACE ON NATIONAL ORGANIZATION AND STRATEGY
573
Drives for Closer Defense Unification
574
Air Force Demands for a Single Service
584
New Authority for United Commands
586
Organization of Military and National Space Programs
589
Establishment of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration
594
Minimum Deterrence or Counterforce
606
Meeting Crises in Lebanon and the Taiwan Straits
610
Minimum Deterrence or Counterforce?
618
NOTES
629
INDEX
639
Copyright

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Page 150 - Your primary object will be the progressive destruction and dislocation of the German military, industrial, and economic system, and the undermining of the morale of the German people to a point •where their capacity for armed resistance is fatally weakened.
Page 292 - Should such an attack occur — one hesitates to say where such an armed attack could come from — the initial reliance must be on the people attacked to resist it and then upon the commitments of the entire civilized world under the Charter of the United Nations...
Page 428 - But there is no local defense which alone will contain the mighty landpower of the Communist world. Local defenses must be reinforced by the further deterrent of massive retaliatory power.
Page 595 - I propose that we agree that outer space should be used only for peaceful purposes. We face a decisive moment in history in relation to this matter. Both the Soviet Union and the United States are now using outer space for the testing of missiles designed for military purposes. The time to stop is now.
Page 292 - Now the Pacific has become an Anglo-Saxon lake and our line of defense runs through the chain of islands fringing the coast of Asia. It starts from the Philippines and continues through the Ryukyu Archipelago, which includes its main bastion, Okinawa. Then it bends back through Japan and the Aleutian Island chain to Alaska.
Page 293 - Nations furnish such assistance to the Republic of Korea as may be necessary to repel the armed attack and to restore international peace and security in the area.
Page 248 - The Parties agree that an armed attack against one or more of them in Europe or North America shall be considered an attack against them all; and consequently they agree that, if such an armed attack occurs, each of them, in exercise of the right of individual or collective...
Page 453 - To provide for meeting lesser hostile action — such as local aggression not broadened by the intervention of a major aggressor's forces — growing reliance can be placed upon the forces now being built and strengthened in many areas of the free world. But because this reliance cannot be complete, and because our own vital interests, collective security and pledged faith might well be involved, there remain certain contingencies for which the United States should be ready with mobile forces to...
Page 168 - Air Power includes a nation's ability to deliver cargo, people, destructive missiles and war-making potential through the air to a desired destination to accomplish a desired purpose. Air Power is not composed alone of the war-making components of aviation. It is the total aviation activity — civilian and military, commercial and private, potential as well as existing.
Page 35 - Hereafter the Army Air Service shall control all aerial operations from land bases, and naval aviation shall have control of all aerial operations attached to a fleet...

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